War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0468 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

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GAULEY BRIDGE, September 2, 1861-9 p. m.

Numbers 5.]

General W. S. ROSECRANS,

Clarksburg, Va.:

Lieutenant-Colonel Enyart, of First Kentucky, with six companies, attacked a force of the enemy at Boone Court-House to-day and completely routed them. Twenty-five of the enemy's dead were counted, and it is supposed there are more. Our men had six wounded. In the fight the village was burned. I have no particulars as to how or by whom. Lieutenant-Colonel Frizell, of the Eleventh, was attacked this evening by the enemy's advance on New River, but the firing was not protracted, as darkness quickly came on. The indications are more like an attack in force from that side in the morning than we have yet seen them. A full regiment with a company of cavalry advanced slowly and cautiously toward him, and after feeling his pickets seem to be resting for the night. The Eleventh is now occupying a tolerably strong natural position about six miles from here, and unless greatly outnumbered will hold the rebels back and whip them. If they are driven in, we will try what can be done here.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

(Copy to Governor Dennison.)

[5.]

GAULEY BRIDGE, September 3, 1861-8 a. m.

Numbers 6.]

General W. S. ROSECRANS,

Clarksburg:

A brisk attack this morning in front still continues. Some evidence of an attack also on the Fayette side.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[5.]

GAULEY BRIDGE, September 3, 1861-5 p. m.

Numbers 7.]

General W. S. ROSECRANS,

Clarksburg, Va.:

We have had out advance guard attacked to-day on both the New River and Fayette roads, and the skirmishing has been kept up all day. Out posts on New River have maintained themselves well and driven back the rebels, who, however, are in sufficient force to enable them to keep tolerably close. On Fayette side the pickets have been driven in close to the river, that side being less favorable to hold. We have only 1 man killed and 4 or 5 wounded. The enemy has suffered cnsiderable loss. It seems to have been a concerted attack, and has kept all our available men busy. They are numerous enough to keep us so. The news from Cross-Lanes is conflicting. Our scouting parties are confident no considerable force is this side the Gauley, and this is confirmed by the quietness of the country up to some small cavalry posts near Peters Creek. But eight men of the Seventh have found their way in, who say they did not get beyond the enemy's pickets till last night, and they were confident, although concealed in the house of a Union man, that the rebels were still there in force and intrenching. They however, have had no chance to see for the themselves. Major Hines was