War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0246 Chapter LXIII. MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., &. W. VA.

Search Civil War Official Records

to his house, but it will be late before I get there. I will keep a lookout, and if I get a chance to strike the enemy on the flank I will do so. I have an idea that the enemy may withdraw farther to the right, but this is another reason why I should withdraw, so as to have my troops available for a move to the right. Though I withdraw, I think we have done very well and the movement is in accordance with what I think are your views. I don't think the enemy has any designs to advance on the road by Hundley's Corner, but I have Rodes there to prevent reconnoitering parties and for greater security. Burnside's corps in on this flank, and the whole object of the enemy is, I think, to protect his flank.

Respectfully,

J. A. EARLY,

Major-General.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.

[36.]

JUNE 4, [1864.]

GENERAL: Scouts report to movement of enemy against my left of to our left. Enemy's cavalry pickets from Bowles'to Via's and across to Haw's Shop. No infantry beyond Totopotomoy. I think enemy's right rests at Bethesda, thrown back and strongly intrenched. All quiet in front except occasional sharpshooting.

J. A. EARLY,

Major-General.

General LEE.

[36.]

JUNE 5, 1864.-5.30 p. M.

GENERAL: Captain PAGE crossed the Totopotomoy at Pole Green Church, and went down and recrossed to F. Whitlock's (see General Smith's map), and from there to Via's near road from Bowles' to Haw's Shop, and found this road picketed with cavalry, and he could not get through. My left brigade was thrown back yesterday before moving on this road to protect the left flank. Captain PAGE then recrossed the Totopotomoy and went down in the direction of Haw's Shop and found the road picketed by cavalry here also. He learned from some citizens that all the infantry had crossed over to this side of the Totopotomoy. He saw no infantry about Whitlock's or Via's. If any advance had been contemplated on my left, he certainly would have found infantry at Whitlock's, which is a commanding position. He could not see near Bethesda, but I am satisfied from the state of things we left, and the existence of the cavalry pickets, that the enemy's right is at Bethesda, thrown back along and parallel to the road from Bethesda, and the assistant adjutant-general of one of the divisions of Burnside's corps, who was captured by Rodes' command, stated that theyhad intrenched at that point a day or two before with view to the movement by the left. In the morning I will test the enemy's strength at Bethesda. It is too late now. I have no fears for my left. I saw to-day some prisoners from the Eighteenth Corps. One of them was quite communicative and said Butler had been superseded by Smith. He further said, though not in my presence, that their loss was quite large yesterday, and that