War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0234 Chapter LXIII. MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., &. W. VA.

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part in a reconnaissance made by the brigade, in which the casualties were 3 enlisted men killed, 5 wounded, and 1 missing.

Second epoch.- May 8, marched rapidly to Todd's Tavern, intrenched and remained till the afternoon of the 9th, when the movement to the any River was commenced; crossed and bivouacked between any and Po Rivers. The larger portion of the regiment was placed on picket. On the 10th the picket-line was driven in by the enemy, the casualties of this command amounting to 10 enlisted men wounded and 2 missing. During the day the brigade was not engaged. On the 11th the regiment supported a skirmish line while a line of works was erected in the rear; casualties for the day, 1 officers wounded and 1 enlisted man. During the day the brigade was not engaged. On the 11th the regiment supported a skirmish line which a line of works was erected in the rear; casualties for the day, 1 officer wounded and 1 enlisted man. During the night the regiment marched with the corps, and at daylight on the 12th formed into line and advanced in the charge on the enemy's works. Their pickets were surprised and captured, and the first line of works was easily carried. An attempt was made to carry the second line, but proved unsuccessful, though a portion of this regiment passed beyond them. A section of a battery taken from the enemy was turned upon themand worked under command of Captain Pennell, of this regiment. Major-General Johnson, a division commander, was taken prisoner by Sergt. Frank Haskell, of Company C, and Private John F. Totman, Company A. The regiment remained at the front during the day and night. Casualties were 3 enlisted men killed, 40 wounded, and 10 missing. On May 16 Major Moore, Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, who had been in command since May 7, was relieved by me. On the 17th the regiment moved into the front line of works and relieved a portion of the Third Brigade, and occupied the position till the morning of the 18th, when we were relieved by the First Division. Soon after an attack was made on the enemy's lines by the First Division. Soon after an attack was made on the enemy's lines by the First and Second Divisions, the Third Division being held in reserve. Though under fire most of the time, we sustained no loss. On the 19th moved with the division into a field near the Anderson house, where it was expected the day would be given to rest, but about 5 p. M. orders came to "fall in," and we marched at double-quick in the direction of the Fredericksburg road, where the enemy (Ewell's corps) had commenced an attack on our supply trains. The brigade, under the immediate supervision of Major-General Birney, was formed into two lines; the second, consisting of the Ninety-third New York and this regiment, was placed under my command. An advance was ordered, and we marched in line into the dense woods. Here we became separated from the first line. I sent out messengers to ascertain, if posible, its position. Not meeting with any success, I ordered the command to advance toward the firing in our front. We soon found the heavy artillery brigade engaged with the enemy, and moving to the front relieved a battalion of the First Maine Heavy Artillery, forming a connection with the left of theFirst Brigade (Colonel Egan). Night coming on, a picket-line was established in our front, and we remained in position, exposed to the fire of the enemy. Earth-works were thrown up for protection, the men using tin plates and bayonets for the purpose. At daylight the whole line advanced, and in connection with the First Brigade we captured a large number of prisoners. The main body of the enemy having withdrawn and recrossed the river, we rejoined the Second Brigade and returned to camp.

Third epoch.-Early on the morning of the 21st we commenced a movement to the left, and at noon passed through Bowling Green. The heat and dust were oppressive, and rendered the march excessively fatiguing. We took up a position near Milford Station, where we