War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0035 Chapter LXIII. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

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enemy were greatly crippled and their advance effectually checked. Under cover, however, of some brushwood, and because when seen they could not for a considerable time be distinguished from our own troops, a body of the enemy's infantry succeeded in gaining a point near the batteries on the left. They were promptly met by a charge from the infantry that had, under General Jackson, for our protection, held place in our rear. From the melee thus occasioned almost in our midst it became necessary at once to remove our guns to another point. They were accordingly limbered immediately and withdrawn to a second position to the right and rather farther back. But the work done was sufficient; the enemy, crippled by our cannon and driven by the fire and bayonets of our brave infantry, gave up the day and began to retreat, an we could only hasten that retreat by a fire well aimed from the guns of longest range. I rejoice to testify to the admirable conduct of all the officers and men under my command and observation. Without exception they behaved with exemplary coolness, skill, and persevering determination and I am thankful indeed to be able to state that under the shield of a guardian Providence we were nearly all mercifully preserved.

W. N. PENDLETON,

Colonel, Artillery, &c.

General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON,

Commanding.

[2.]

MANASSAS JUNCTION, July 23, 1861.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report to you the conduct and condition of the Rockbridge Artillery in connection with the battle of the 21st instant, as attached to your noble brigade and under my immediate command:

By command of the adjutant- general, this battery, with that of Captain Alburtis, was detained near our resting position on the night of the 20th under my command, awaiting orders to move at any moment, Captain Stanard's battery and that of Major Walton having been sent o to your support. While we thus waited the action began to rage far tot he left, and after some time General Johnson passed with his staff and directed me to advance with one of the batteries, leaving the other to follow with some infantry that were to come on. With this battery I accordingly hastened on, leaving that of Captain Alburtis to follow as directed. on the way I was met by a courier from General Beauregard urging up all the artillery. Increasing if possible our already rapid advance, in consequence of sending a messenger to bring on Captain Alburtis at once, I proceeded with the Rockbridge Artillery to the scene. Near the field we came up with the battery of Major Walton and part of Captain Stanard's, awaiting orders. Here on inquiry of General Johnson I learned the general course w\e were to take, and being urged to press forward all that could advance, I carried on this battery, with the two guns of Captain Stanard, word being left for Captain Alburtis to join us immediately. pressing along the narrow and difficult toad through the pine thicket we reached the point where you were standing as suitable for our position. Here the pieces were all as speedily as possible bethought into action and continued their skillfully directed an well sustained fire for perhaps some three hours, doing immense damage tot he enemy and contributing an important share to the glorious victory of the day. The batteries of the enemy having, under the powerful fire directed against them,