War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0032 MD., E. N. C., Pa., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

to necessary discipline, undergone hardships, and otherwise co- operated in fulfilling the responsibility of the command.

And finally, trusting that this command has fulfilled its duties and that impartial history will do justice to the important part taken by it in achieving the late glorious victory,

I remain, general, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

PHILIP ST. GEO. COCKE,

Colonel, Commanding Fifth Brigade, Army of Potomac.

General BEAUREGARD,

Commanding Army of the Potomac.

NOTE.- The Fifth Brigade proper consisted of the Nineteenth, Eighteenth, and Twenty- eighth Regiments of Virginia Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Strange, Colonels Withers and R. T. Preston commanding; Latham's battery of artillery, four brass 6 pounder guns, and Captains Terry's and Langhorne's troops of cavalry. Whilst at Centerville, prior to the battle of the 21st of July, Major Wheat's Louisiana First Special Battalion was added to my command and stationed at or near Frying Pan Church, and Captain Alexander's troop of cavalry also added to Terry's at the same place. Subsequently Major Evans was ordered from Leesburg with Sloan's Fourth Regiment of South Carolina Volunteers to Frying Pan Church, with orders to report to me and act as a part of my command stationed at that place. With this force I marched under general orders on the 17th of July to take position at or near the Stone Bridge. Between the 17th and 19th Colonel Eppa Hunton with his command arrived at Lewis' farm (Portici), with orders to report for duty with my command, bringing with him his regiment of Virginia volunteers, Captain Rogers' battery of 4-pounder brass cannon, and three troops of cavalry. To this command was also added three companies under Captain Schaeffer, which had previously been stationed at the Stone Bridge, and three companies of Fauquier volunteers, part of Colonel William Smith's Forty- ninth Regiment Virginia Volunteers.

PHILIP ST. GEO. COCKE,

Colonel, Commanding Fifth Brigade.

[2.]

Report of Lieutenant Colonel Joseph P. Jones Fifth north Carolina Infantry, of the battle of Bull Run.

BLACKBURN'S FORD, Bull Run, July 22, 1861.

GENERAL: I have the honor to submit the following report:

In obedience to orders yesterday morning to cross the creeks and take position on the right of the ravine in front of the enemy preparatory to making a charge upon a battery, then being used against your command, I dispatched two companies in advance as skirmishers, and proceeded at once to occupy the hill within a few hundred yards of the battery. Upon reaching that point I found the two companies sent out as skirmishers. We were fired upon with grape and canister, killing one man and wounding three. The whole battalion stood firm until an order was received to retire to the ravine and remain until further orders, which was done in good order. Supposing, then, my men to be safe, and being told by your staff officer that you were but a very short distance from me, I committed the indiscretion of going to where you were to ask some special instructions. While absent four companies of my battalion, without any proper cause, retreated about 100 yards. I