War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0027 Chapter LXIII. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

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its entire front, which intrenchemnt, by direction of Captain Harris, of the Engineers, was rendered quite effective. Between the two left companies of Lieutenant- Colonel Strange's regiment one piece of Latham's battery, placed in position by Captain Harris, of the Engineers, commanded the road leading to the ford through the meadowland pines in front of the ford. Next beyond the flank of the Nineteenth Regiment, along the high bank of Bull Run, was place din position selected by Captain Harris, concealed from the enemy by a copse or undergrowth, one other gun of Latham's battery. To the left of this second gun of Latham's battery was placed Captain Schaeffer's command, two companies on this side of the creek and part of one company on the opposite side of Bull Run, availing themselves of the natural formation of the bank as a breast- work from being which to fire upon the enemy. To the left of a gorge penetrating captain Schaeffer's position, a section of Rogers' battery was stationed on an eminence to command the approaches to this gorge and the gorge formed by young's Branch running in from our side. These guns were also placed in position by Captain Harris, of the Engineers, the bluff bank of the creek terminating at young's Branch near the position or gorge just above Rogers' guns, and giving place to low bank. Just here a portion of Colonel William Smith's three companies was posted, commanded by him in person, to dispute the passage of the enemy at the gorge on Young's Branch, which intersected our line as above described. The other part of Colonel Smith's three companies was held in reserve (kn a sheltered position), to be used as occasion might require, and ordered to charge the enemy if he succeeded in crossing Bull Run. This pass of young's Branch being deemed one of the most inviting for the enemy, it was thought necessary to hold in still further reserve to dispute his passage the entire regiment of Colonel Eppa Hunton, which was therefore placed near by in a covered position, with orders to support Colonel Smith's battalion in case of need. One section of Rogers' battery, commanded by himself, and three troops of cavalry were held in reserve and placed under cover in the hollow or depression beyond the crest and to the north of Lewis' house From Young's Branch toward Stone Bridge and beyond the position was covered by the troops attached to my brigade, under the immediate command of Major Evans. Two pieces of Latham's battery, under Lieutenant Davidson, commanded from the hill the approach to Stone B ridge and the road through the felled timber described in the first part of this report. To the left of the Stone Bridge were the troops under the command of Major Evans, whilst his sharpshooters skirted the two edges of the forest bordering upon the felled timber on our side of the bridge. THE cavalry of Evans' aged- some in scouting in the direction of Sudley's Mill to give notice of the enemy's approaches in that direction and others held in reserve.

Sudley's Mill is on the branch of Bull Run called Chartpin, near its mouth, three miles northwest of Stone Bridge. At Sudley's Mill a branch rad crosses from the direction of Leesburg, passing directly toward Manassas, intersecting the turnpike at right angles at a stone house one mile and a quarter west, or in our rear of the Stone Bridge. It was this road of which the enemy availed himself to turn our left and to get on our flank and rear at Stone Bridge in his boasted march for Manassas. His plans were well arranged and skillfully conducted, for whilst he threatened our entire front form Stone Bridge to below Lewis' Ford by a force estimated at from 12,000 to 15,000 men, and kept