War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 1242 OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST. Chapter LXII.

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the vicinity of the latter. If not done, serious interruption of the overland mail is almost certain. The commanding officer at Fort Baise has been written to on the subject. The force now at and en route to Fort Boise will be, it is thought, sufficient for the three. He has been so advised and directed to keep such force as he can at or near Salmon Falls. This is the mail route and the one mostly used by the emigration. The vicinity of Rock Creek has always been noted for Indian depredations, being readily accessible from their hiding places in the Goosa Creek Mountains and the eastern branches of the Owyhee River. The mail stations on the creek were robbed about the 1st of this month. The commanding officer at Fort Boise has sent a small detachment of infantry for their protection, which it was conteplated to icnrease with thirty or forty cavalry. All the cavalry available is now en route via Canyon City to Fort Boise. This route leads them to the south of the old emigrant road and the Burnt River country, and through the country occupied by Indians when intending depredations on Burnt River. Considerable [loss] has been sustained already, one house being robbed and destroyed by fire and about 100 horses and mules stolen. A part of one of the infantry companies now on the road to Fort boise has been halted, by direction of the commanding officer of that post, for protection of the settlements. I think that the movements of Lieutneant Hobart's command (cavalry) will do way with the necessity for this in a few weeks. The Indians drove their property in direction of Harney Lake.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. F. MAURY,

Colonel First Oregon Cavalry, Commanding District of Oregon.

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT,

Washington, May 26, 1865.

Major General I. MCDOWELL,

Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that since the date of my letter to you of 20th of February, 1865, relative to ordnance for the Pacific sea-board, the Engineer Department has made application to the Ordnance Department that the following additional gun sand carriages be sent to that coast, viz: To fort at Fort Point-six 200-pounder Parrott guns with center pintle carriges; one 15-inch smooth-bore gun with center pintle carriage; three 15-inch smooth-bore guns, w ith front pintle carriages; twenty 10-inch smooth-bore guns, with casemate carriages; two 300-pounder Parrott guns, with center pintle barbette carriages. To mouth of Columbia River-five 200-pounder parrott guns, with front pintle carriages; thirty 10-inch smooth-bore guns, with front pintle barbette carriages; two 300-pounder Parrott guns, with front pintle barbette carriages; five 100-pounder Parrott guns, w ith center pintle barbette carriages. To Alcatraz Island-seven 10-inch smooth-bore guns, with front pintle barbetter carriages. To San Francisco, for distrubition by Colonel R. E. De Russy-three 15-inch guns, with one center pintle and two front pintle carriages; eighteen 10-inch guns, with front pintle barbette carriages. The Ordnance Department propose to sen dthese guns during the remaining months of the present year.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. DELAFIELD,

General and Chief Engineer.