War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 1214 OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST. Chapter LXII.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, April 28, 1865.

Major General IRVIN MCDOWELL,

Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

The President of the United States directs that you take immediate possession for military use of a lot of land in the city of San Francisco, known as the "custom-house lot. " For full particulars, apply to the collector of customs at San Francisco.

W. A. NICHOLS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CHICO, April 28, 1865.

Major General I. MCDOWELL,

Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco:

GENERAL: The petition which I have the honor to inclose herewith is signed by the officers and others of Siskiyou County, and was sent to me with the request that I would have Governor Low, Comptroller Oulton, and other State officials sign it, and then personally present it to you. But this is not necessary. You already comprehend the stiuation. Surprise Valley is in Siskiyou County. I indorse the petition, and believe a military post is required at that point not only in summer, but in winter, too. Post route Numbers 14903 will pass through that valley. I inclose a slip from the Morning Call, containing the said route advertised. Should the route via Fort Crook and Pitt River be traveled the coming summer, it will intersect the main route (Susanville to Boise) at or near Surprise Valley. Passenger trains have been running reuglarly via Susanville to Idaho since April 3. No Indian troubles have as yet occurred, but I am in constant apprehension. Stages are to be put on the route as soon as the snow is off, when the regular mail will begin. With a full company at Smoke Creek or a point a little farther west, to range on the road to Surprise Valley and on the Umboldt road as far east as Black Rock and the station prayed for in this petition at or near Surprise, present emergencies so far as I can see would be met. Beyond Surprise, however, there is a distance of 150 miles entirely unsettled. The Indians may not be hostile, or there may be few or none there. Time will show.

I remain, general, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

J. BIDWELL.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

Major-General MCDOWELL,

Commander Military Department Pacific Coast:

SIR: There is a large and fertile valley in the eastern portion of this (Siskiyou) county, in the northeastern part of the State, known as Surprise Valley, which during the last year has been rapudly settling up by emigration from other localities, and which is capable of sustaining a large population; and inasmuch as the recent difficulties between the Indians and white settlers, resulting in the effusion of some blood and considerable loss of stock and other property, has already deterred, and is now deterring, many who are desirous of emigrating thither with their families, for the purpose of suppressing these difficulties and preventing future depredations on the part of the Indians and the full protection of the settlers in their laudable efforts toward developing the resources of this section of country, the following request is most respectfully submitted, to wit: That one or more companies of the