War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 1213 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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P. S. -Just as I finished the above your letter of the 13th was handed me. In regard to the trunk, Donnell has gone again to San Francisco and will return soon. He will call for it, and bring it as his baggage. I don't think the extra charges on it brought in that way will be over $15. I need it if I remain here, which I now intend doing. If sent as freight it will be knocked to pieces.

MATT.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Numbers 94.

Fort Vancounver, Wash. Ter., April 26, 1865.

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III. Captain L. L. Williams, First Oregon Infantry, with his company (H) will proceed without delay by water to Fort Dalles en route to Camp Watson. The assistant quartermaster at Fort Vancouver will furnish transportation to Fort Dalles. At a suitable point fifty or sixty miles from The Dalles, on the Canyon City road, an officer and twenty enlisted men will be detached, with instructions to await the arrival of and escort D. P. Thompson's surveying party to the southern boundary of Oregon, and rejoin its company at Camp Watson on the completion of that duty. Fifty days' rations and the necessary transportation will be furnished for this detachment. Actg. Asst. Surg. J. W. Davies will acompany this detachment. The acting assistant surgeon at Fort Dalles will turn over the necessary medical supplies.

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By order of Colonel R. F. Maury:

F. B. WHITE,

First Lieutenant and Adjt. First Oregon Cav., Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, April 27, 1865.

WILLIAM L. BOOKER, Esq.,

Her British Majesty's Consul;

GEORGE GORDON, Esq.,

D. FRASHER, Esq.,

H. C. FERGUSON, Esq.,

Committee, San Francisco, Cal.:

GENTLEMEN: I am greatly gratified by the receipt of the resultions passed by the meeting of the British residents of this city at the British consulate on the 18th instant, expressing sympathy and condolence with the American people at the calamity which has befallen them in the assassination of their great and good President, and the attempted assassination of their Secretary of State. The sentiments of the British residents will meet with a warm response from every good man, and especially every good American, and I am sure the American Government will receive the resolutions as a renewed assurance of the good feeling which exists between the two kindred countries.

With my own sincere and respectful acknowledgment, I remain, gentlemen, your most obedient and humble servant,

IRVIN MCDOWELL,

Major-General, Commanding Department.