War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 1195 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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any of the sections of country where these difficulties are occurring, as it will be time enough to consider the question when the Indians are punished and quiet restored.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS, DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA,

Sacramento, April 13, 1865.

Major C. McDERMIT,

Second California Cavalry,

Commanding Sub-District of Nevada, Fort Churchill:

MAJOR: Your Special Orders, Numbers 4, current series, with copy of your letter to Mr. Havilland of 9th instant, and also other papers relative to Indian distrubances in Paradise Valley, &c., are received. I am desired by the brigadier-general commanding to express his approval of the prompt measures you have taken to punish those Indians and protect the settlers, and also to say that you are authorized to pass the boundaries of Nevada, should you find if necessary to do so, in the pursuit of hostile Indians. You will keep these headquarters advised of the latest information you may have of the movements of your troops and the condition of affairs, and should these distrubances be prolonged you will take the field yourself and pusnih these Indians so that the recollection of it will prevent any future outbreaks in that quarter.

Very respectfully,

E. D. WAITE,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

SACRAMENTO, April 13, 1865.

Major C. McDERMIT,

Fort Churchill:

Have you any later news from Paradise Valley? Do not avail yourself of your leave until quiet is restored.

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, Numbers 26.

San Francisco, Cal., April 14, 1865.

I. A camp will be established smewhere in the upper part of Surprise Valley or southern part of Goose Lake Valley, as nearly as many be in the vicinity of the roads from Chico, via Susanville and Surprise Valley, and from Red Bluff, via Fort Crook, to the Owyhee, Idaho, and of the emigrant roads from Humboldt River to the southern part of Oregon.

II. The camp will be established with regard to wood, water, and grass for the station of a company of cavalry and a temporary depot for forage ans subsistance for an additional company, which will be sent to move over the country beyond.