War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 1158 OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST. Chapter LXII.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, Numbers 18.

San Francisco, Cal., March 11, 1865.

I. The following measures will be taken to enforce General Orders, Numbers 308, from the War Department, of December 29, 1864: All vessels coming into the port of San Francisco from a foreign country will be boarded by an officer as soon practicable after their arrival, and no passenger from a foreign country will be allowed to land without a proper passport.

II. Passengers coming mediately from New York by way of the isthmus routes, or from Oregon by way of Vancouver Island, will not be considered as scoming from a foreign country. Masters of steamers plying on those routes will make a separate list of their way passengers, and give it to the inspecting officer as he comes on board.

III. Passengers going hence to Oregon by way of Vancouver Island will not be required to procure passports.

IV. A separate list will be made of passengers coming on board of steamers at Vancovuer Island for Oregon, and will be given to the inspecting officer, who will come on board at Cape Disappoiintement.

By command of Major-General McDowell:

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Numbers 60.

Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., March 11, 1865.

Captain George B. Currey, First oregon Cavalry, will turn over the command at Fort Hoskins to the officer next in rank, and report in person at these headquarters.

BENJ. ALVORD,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding District.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, March 12, 1865.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding the Armies of the United States, Hdqrs. City Point, Va.:

GENERAL: I was exceedinglu gratified by the receipt of your letter of the 8th of January, cautioning me concerning the movements of Doctor Gwin and giving contingent instructions with reference to any hostile movements he may cause to be undertaken against the United States from the Mexican State of Sonora. I have taken the deepest interest in this Mexican question ever since England and Sapain withdrew from the invasion of Mexico and it became evident the French were continuing it for other than the ostensible object for which it was set on foot. Since coming here I have received from Mr. Seward some notes from Paris, showing for what purpose, it was understood there, Doctor Gwin was sent to Mexico.

The war in the East has forced and is forcing numbers of persons inimical to us into my department, and the fortunate result of the last election and the little hope the disunionists have of a future here is making them turn their attention to Mexico as a place of refuge. I believe this is the case also with those from the Southwestern States and Texas, as I hear of persons coming over from Texas into Chihuahua and thence to Sonora. It was not long since the Democratic press of