War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 1086 OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST. Chapter LXII.

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command to take post near Bishop's Creek, the quartermaster's department furnishing the necessary transportation. Subsistence for the winter will be furnished from your post as well as the necessary camp and garrison equipage, together with a few tools to enable the company to hut itself during the rainy season. No expense will be incurred in the movement of this company to Owen's River Valley.

Respectfully,

E. D. WAITE.

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Numbers 168.

Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., December 7, 1864.

I. As the companies of the First Infantry Oregon Volunteers are mustered into service they will go into camp at the rendezvous near Salem, which is named Camp Russell, in honor of the late distinguished Brigadier General David A. Russell, who fell in the glorious victory near Winchester, Va., and who was so highly esteemed by the citizens of Oregon. Captain J. M. Drake, First Oregon Cavalry, will have command of the camp.

* * * * *

BENJ. ALVORD.

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding District.

WAR DEPARTMENT.

Washington City, December 8, 1864

Major General IRVIN McDOWELL,

San Francisco, Cal.:

Please order no draft in Oregon without special directions from this Department.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

Secretary of War

VISALIA, CAL., December 8, 1864

General IRVIN McDOWELL

Commanding Department of the Pacific:

The undersigned citizens of Tulare County, Cal., would respectfully represent that there are now scattered through the valley of Owen's River, east of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, quite a number of citizens engaged in minning, farming, and grazing, who are living under such circumstances of isolation as to be unable to afford each other protection from hostile Indians; that there are now in said valley some 60,000 head of cattle belonging to citizens of this county, and which have been driven there in a consequence of the drought in the Tulare Valley, that said region is at this time threatened with hostilities by large bands of Indians of the Pi-ute and Owen's River tribes, instigated and led on to some exent by bad white men, who consort with them; that a number of citizens have already been killed and wounded and much property destroyed by said Indians, and that unless speedy measures be taken to prevent, the entire valley will be devasted; that reckless and imprudent citizens have been blamable to some extent in exciting discontent and