War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 1080 OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST. Chapter LXII.

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those fights, and soon after the latter I was promoted to a lieutenant-colonelcy. I have since organizsed a fine cavalry regiment and been in several engagements in Arkansas and the Indian Nation. My command will in all probability remain in Texas during the next campaign. I would like very much to have you write to Miss Patrick; tell her George is well and in Texas. I would also like to have you write to my sister Kate; she will be delighted to hear that I am living and well. I have not heard a word from my people since I left California. I fear my brothers in Pennsylvania may have gone into the Northern Army; if so, I can only pity; I have no desire to see them again. I would be delighted to see you. Indeed, if I had only twenty years to live, I would give up ten years of that time to see you and talk with you one hour. I may survive this war. If sok, we may meet again; but should I fall, you will have the last kind thought, the last fervent prayer of

Your devoted friend,

DAN SHOWALTER.

Write often; do not wait to hear from me, but write whenever an opportunity presents itself.

DAN.

GUAYMAS, November 29, 1864.

Major-General McDOWELL:

DEAR SIR: Mr. Elihu Baker, major-domo of the Arizona Mining Company, has just come down from Arizona to escort me to the Territory. He informs me that a band of Confederates are encamped in Sonora, between Magdalena and the boundary, awaiting re-enforcements from Texas, Chihuahua, and Durango, to make an attack upon the advanced military posts of Calaba, Tubac, and Tucson. If they are successful in such a raid, they will for a while have the southern portion of Arizona at their mercy. Although you may not be the military commander of that department, I think it proper to give you this information as it may be in your power to communicate with those who have the power to re-enforce speedily the limited garrisons of the posts so seriously threatened.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant

M. O. DAVIDSON.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA.

Sacramento, November 29, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel R. C. DRUM.

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

COLONEL: Inclosed herewith is a petition of the citizens of Owen's River Valley for military protection, together with a letter from Adjutant-General Evans. The petitioners do not set forth any actual hospitilities, and simply ask for the troops in the valley as a precautionary measure. However, to allay their apprehensions I would recommend that a company of Nevada infantry be sent from Fort Churchill and loacted on Bishop's Creek near Owensville, with provisions for the winter, tents, &c., with a few tools, to enable the company to hut itself during the rainy season.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT.

Brigadier-General, Commanding.