War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0951 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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a much larger force than my small command is absolutely necessary to defend the post and reservation in case such attempt is made. It is for the department commander to determine whether there is or there is not a probability of a civil war or trouble of that nature taking place in this State. I am fully satisfied that the disloyal element in these counties and valleys are confidently expecting that an attempt will be made this fall to plunge this State in conflict with the General Government, and that they are only waiting the approach of the November election and a signal from their leaders to inaugurate warfare in these valleys and mountains. I have taken all the precaution possible to guard against surprise without exciting their suspicion.

Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

C. D. DOUGLAS,

Captain, Second Infantry California Volunteers, Commanding Post.

[First indorsement.]

Respectfully referred to Brigadier-General Wright for his information and action:

By order:

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA,

San Francisco, August 29, 1864.

Respectfully returned to department headquarters. Measures will be taken to suppress any attempt at violence or unlawful proceeding by any parties within the District of California.

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

VANCOUVER, August 18, 1864-4. 30 p. m.

Lieutenant Colonel R. C. DRUM,

Asst. Adjt. General, Headquarters Department of the Pacific:

I am pleased to announce that the telegraph is completed to this place, crossing the Columbia by submarine cable.

BENJ. ALVORD,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

CITY POINT, August 20, 1864-12 m.

(Received 9 p. m.)

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I know nothing officially of any dissatisfaction with McDowell's administration in California, but, as stated in my previous dispatch, have heard that he was not liked. I know that the Pacific Coast requires a commanding officer of firmness enough to do his duty in spite of opposition, but without interference with civil rights and without trying to enforce his own peculiar opinions upon the community. I am now well enough acquainted with General McDowell to judge how he will do, and therefore do not ask his removal unless there is something known at your office demanding it.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.