War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0904 Chapter LXII. OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST.

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CAMP DOUGLAS, July 15, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Finding that I am prepared to resist any attack, and knowing that the city is at the mercy of my guns and will be surely destroyed if my troops are attacked, the Mormons seem to be quieting down somewhat, although armed forces are assembling inside of Brigham's yard, and having nightly drills with artillery and infantry. My impression is that there is no immediate probability of conflict. The excitement is dying away among the masses of the people; still in many parts of the Territory the national currency is openly repudiatel under the dictation of the church. The leaders are buying up from emigrants and others all the arms and ammunition possible.

P. EDW. CONNOR,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

SAN FRANCISCO, July 15, 1864.

Brigadier General P. E. CONNOR,

Salt Lake City:

The major-general commanding the department approves of your determination to avoid a conflict with the Mormons. Do so by all means. Is there not some other cause than the mere presence of the guard in the city? Examine closely. Remove the guards and troops sooner than their presence should cause a war.

RICHD. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, July 16, 1864.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to communicate a copy of a confidential dispatch of the 8th instant, addressed to this Department by the acting U. S. consul at Havana, relative to an alleged plan of the insurgents to extend their operations to Southern California. The Mr. Frink to whom the dispatch refers is now here, and the expediency of employing him in the service, to which Mr. Savage refers, is submitted to your consideration.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

[Inclosure.] CONFIDENTIAL

CONSULATE GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES,

Havana, July 8, 1864.

Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington:

SIR: Mr. Joseph A. Frink, who arrived here some days ago from Matamoras, has made to me the following statement: He has been for many years living in Chihuahua, Mexico, employed as a trader and carrier to and from Mexico, New Mexico, Texas, &c., has two brothersin-law and many relatives serving in our armies, is a native of New London, Conn., and a Unionist in feeling, but circumstances have compelled him to appear as a secessionist, or rather the rebels have taken it for granted that he is one. Being in Monterey last April, he discovered that a scheme is on foot to strike a blow in Southern California.