War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0902 Chapter LXII. OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST.

Search Civil War Official Records

under arms and are still assembling, and threaten to drive my provost guard from the city; alleged excuse for armed demonstration, the presence of the provost guard in the city. My command is much scattered, having only 300 men at this camp. If conflict takes place, which I will endeavor to avoid, can hold my position until re-enforced from neighboring Territories.

P. EDW. CONNOR,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CAMP REYNOLDS,

Angel Island, Cal., July 14, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: In obedience to the direction of the major-general commanding I have the honor to submit the following report: There are thirteen guns mounted at this post, as follows: In Battery Numbers 2, six 32-pounders; at the wharf, five 32-pounders; at the flag-staff, two siege 24-pounders; total, thirteen guns. The following guns are assigned and are now here; 32-pounder barbette carriages, 4; 8-inch Rodman barbette carriage (front pintle), 1; 10-inch Rodman barbette carriages (front pintle), 2; 10-inch columbiad barbette carriages (center pintle), 2; total, 9. It is understood that one 10-inch columbiad now here was intended for the battery at the south end of Angel Island. One magazine, capable of holding 100 barrels of powder, is cpmpleted in Battery Numbers 2. Another magazine is under construction in Battery Numbers 1. One 32-pounder and the Rodman guns will be mounted without delay in Battery Numbers 2. One 32-pounder will be placed in position at the wharf. The guns mounted at the wharf are not placed there in pursuance of any instructions from the Engineer Department, but it is believed that the general commanding the department expressed himself satisfied with that location some three mounths ago. No other place has been designated for those guns. A parapet will be needed there. The Rodman guns are marked as the property of Colonel R. E. De Russy. It is desirable that they be thransferred to me. Ammunition: The powder in store is good; the amount is 7,400 pounds. Of shot unattached there are-for 24-pounder guns, 200; for 32-pounder guns, 1,500; for 8-inch guns, solid shot, 90. Of shell unattached-for 24-pounder guns, 50; for 32-pounder guns, 745. Of canister (filled)-for 24-pounder guns, 50. The fuses are the common paper kind, and burn in the open air at variable times. Some which should have burned ten seconds yesterday only lasted four, while others reached seven seconds; but all that have been timed so far burn short. Probably they have been a long time on hand at Benicia Arsenal. If the small-sized shells are to be used new fuses will be needed. It will be seen that the Rodman guns have no projectiles, except the few solid shot for the 8-inch; neither have they equipments of any sort save the naked iron chassis and truck. I therefore inclose a requisition for ordnance stores, which I hope may receive the approval of the department commander.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. P. ANDREWS,

Brevet Major, U. S. Army, Captain, Third Artillery, Commanding Post.