War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0893 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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the most proper officer and most acceptable to me of any in the service. I trust you will let me keep him and not have the other. It is of the greatest importance to me.

IRVIN McDOWELL,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, July 9, 1864.

Brigadier General GEORGE WRIGHT, U. S. Volunteers,

Commanding District of California:

GENERAL: The general commanding desires you to repair to San Francisco to attend the inspection of the fortifications in the harbor, to be made on Wednesday, the 13th instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Numbers 44. Drum Barracks, Cal., July 9, 1864.

1. A detail of twenty-three dismounted and two mounted men from Company B, Second California Cavalry, and one sergeant, one corporal, and ten privates of Company D, Native California Cavalry, under command of Major Henry Hancock, Fourth California Infantry, will proceed to-morrow, 10th instant, to El Monte and encamp at that place until further orders. The party will be furnished with necessary camp and garrison equipage, and rationed to include the 20th instant.

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By order of Colonel Curtis:

O. H. LEE,

Second Lieutenant, Fourth California Infty., Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UTAH,

Camp Douglas, Utah Ter., near Great Salt Lake City, July 9, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army,

Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

COLONEL: Referring to the letter I had the honor of addressing you on the 2nd instant relative to the attempt to depreciate the national currency by inaugurating in Utah a gold and silver currency, I beg leave to state that I have had reason since that date for modifying my opinion in relation thereto and the statements therein made. I thn entertained and expressed the opinion that this unpatriotic movement had no other or deeper origin than the greed or disloyalty of certain merchants in Great Salt Lake City. It has since been rendered patent to all the world that the real origin of the movement was Brigham Young, the traitor head of the Mormon Church and people. On last Sabbath in the tabernacle one of the twelve apostles, the supple tool of Brigham Young, announced to the congregation the new policy, and counseled (which is here equivalent to an order) a gold currency in contradiction to that provided by the nation. It was announced that $12 per hundred