War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0881 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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after its arrival at Chico will be sent to that point by wate. At Chico you will establish a depot from which to draw your supplies. Your operations will be confined principally to the counties of Butte, Plumas, and Tehama in this State, unless you may find it necessary, for the success of your expedition, to proceed beyond those limits. The object in view is to maintain the peace of that section of country, giving all necessary protection to the settlers and the peaceable Indians residing on the ranches. The general desires you to make frequent reports to these headquarters, relative to the state of affairs in the section of the State in which you are operating.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SAN FRANCISCO, June 30, 1864.

(Received 10. 45 a. m. July 3.)

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND:

Telegram of June 23 relative to Colonel Black received.

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, Numbers 144.

San Francisco, Cal., June 30, 1864.

* * * * * * *

2. By direction of the Secretary of War, Colonel Henry M. Black, Sixth Infantry California Volunteers, is hereby relieved from duty in this department and will proceed without delay to West Point, N. Y.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADUQARTERS,

Fort Gaston, Cal., June 30, 1864.

Lieutenant JAMES ULIO,

Adjutant Sixth California Volunteers Infantry,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Humboldt District:

SIR: It affords me pleasure to inform the district commander that on the 22nd instant the last lot of Indians of the upper main Trinity River came to this valley and expressed their desire to remain here upon the same terms accorded the others. The Indians all say there are no more in that part of the country; that the soldiers may search as much as they please, but they will not find any Indians. This result has been brought about mainly by Captain Miller's company (C), First Battalion Mountaineers, California Volunteers, which has been operating about half way between this post and Weaverville since May 14. Three days ago the last of the Redwoods, known as Curly-headed Tom's band, arrived and are now here. They express themselves as tired of the war and willing to remain here. I have had several talks with the leading Indians and their professions are all right. This band of Redwoods is the very worst in the country, and have for years been

56 R R-VOL L, PT II