War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0872 Chapter LXII. OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST.

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miles over an easy and broken swell of country practicable for a wached the San Pedro River, four miles above Fort Breckinridge, and encamped; thence to Fort B[reckinridge], whence Captain Tidball with a portion of the command was detached for a night move to Arivaypa Canon. The remainder of the command proceeded to Tucson, where it arrived the 2nd instant.

Captain Tidball found no rancheria of Indians, but a large field of fine wheat, which will be taken for the U. S. service, notwithstanding some few Indians who showed themselves on high distant mesas requested the captain not to destroy this wheat, as they wanted it for their own use. This command arrived her on the 4th instant.

The great upper valley of the Gila is rich in soil, and 50,000 acres are subject to irrigation from the river, but at considerable expense, only by taking out of the Gila at the upper end of this valley a large acequia and carrying it back from the river. There is little grass in the valley, but wood in abundance, and a larger volume of water in the river here than at the Pima Villages.

I mention four points to be considered as suitable for the location of Fort Goodwin, to wit, (1) at La Cienega Grande; (2) three miles above my first camp on the Gila; (3) near the mouth of the San Carlos River, in the valley thereof; (4) and either in the Tularosa Valley or near its outlet into the Gila Valley proper. With regard to the location itself, relative to the supply of water, grass, soil, and wood, La Cienega Grande is sthe best. considered with regard to its geographical and strategical position as commanding most of the great trails and thoroughfares of the Indians, and as opposite Mount Graham Pass, the nearest and most accessible roadway from the south and west, and with regard to water, grass, soil, and wood also, I would select the point in or near the Tularosa Valley. I suggest Captain Tidball as the officer to mark the exact spot at any of the locations named which the general may elect, in connection with Colonel Rigg or other officers.

A more full report of fulh Captain Tidball's report when received, will be soon forwarded.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. H. DAVIS,

Assistant Inspector-General.

P. S. - The prisoners have been dispoesed of by assignment to families, subject to further orders from department headquarters. The captured property will be turned in to the quartemaster at Tucson.

N. H. D.

INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S DEPT., DEPT. OF NEW MEXICO,

Tucson, Ariz. Ter., June 19, 1864.

Captain BEN. C. CUTLER,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Dept. of New Mexico, Santa Fe, N. Mex.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report, for the information of the general commanding, as follows: On the 13th instant inspected the post and troops at Reventon. The command is ordered to Tubac, and 20,000 rations from the supplies en route from Guaymas to be left there; the quality and quantity of water at Reventon one reason of this change. Reports of the examinations of the routes ordered not yet received. I recommend the establishment of a military post at Fort Buchanan under another name; also the abandonment of this place as a depot and military post as soon as possible. Some point on the San Pedro would be