War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0778 OPERATIONS IN THE PACIFIC COAST. Chapter LXII.

Search Civil War Official Records

near your post, and in ordering the quartermaster's department to hire an interpreter, is approved by the general commanding the district. The general commanding does nto aprove of your sending for all the Indians at Salmon Fallsif it is for the purpose of subsisting them. IT will stagger the quartermaster's department to tranpsort subsistence for the troops at Fort Boise and the expeditions to start from there next summer. It is allowable to issue rations in cases of extreme destitution, but the Indians must be taught to rely on their own efforts for subsistence. If the Indians from Salmon Falls come in you will informthem, as Colonel Maury did, of our friendly disposition toward peaceable and quiet Indians, and that our punishments are confined to those who steal from and murder the whites. Treaties were made last summer by Governor Doty, of Utah, with large bands of the Snakes, andit will be well for all those Indians to understnad that if they behave themselves they will not be disturbed by the troops. But for subsistence tell them they must rely, as heretofore, on digging their roots and fishing. They will not be disturbed in fishing at Salmon Falls. In reference to the subsistence of Indians see paragraph V, of General Orders, Numbers 2, of the 5th of January, 1864, from headquarters Department of the Pacific.

By order of General Alvord.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. HOPKINS,

First Lieutenant, First Oregon Cavalry, Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, March 5, 1864.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY,

Washington, D. C.:

SIR: Brigadier General P. E. Connor, commanding the District of Utah, has submitted to me a copy of a communication addressed to Major-General Halleck on the 4th of January last by the Honorable J. F. Kinney, Delegate to Congress from Utah, together with his (Connor's) reply to General Halleck. During the last year the removal of the troops from Camp Duglas was maturely and carefully considered, and I was fully persuaded that the present location at Camp Douglas was the proper position. I have but little faith in the loyalty of the Jormons. They threatneed lawst year to destroy any re-enforcements from California approaching Camp Douglas, but I sent them and they reached there in safety. I would most earnestly recommend not only that Camp Douglas be maintained, but that it be strongly re-enforced.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, March 5, 1864.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY,

Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a communication addressed to my headquarters by Brigadier General B. Alvord, commanding the District of Oregon. * The views of General Alvord are recommended to the

---------------

*See February 25, p. 769.

---------------