War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0743 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE - UNION AND CONDEFERATE.

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Infantry, with 250 men of his regiment, to proceed to Fort Humboldt. A steamer will be chartered as soon as possible to convey the troops to Humboldt, together with ample supplies of quartermaster's and commissary stores, and everything else necessary for a vigorous campaign. I have no fault to find with Colonel Whipple. I have ever found him active, zealous, and energetic, but as a large portion of Colonel Black's regiment was going into the field. I have deemed it proper to place him fro the time being in command of the district. The colonel is an officer of much experience and great energy.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

SAN FRANCISCO, February 8, 1864. (Received 2. 30 a. m. 9th.)

General L. THOMAS:

Major Williams' telegram of 6th instant relating to Colonel Sibley received.

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, February 8, 1864.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY,

Washington, D. C.:

SIR: In consequence of the threatening aspect of our Indian affairs in the northwestern portion of California, I have ordered Colonel H. M. Black, Sixth Infantry California Volunteers, to move with the major and three companies of his regiment to Fort Humboldt. The command will proceed by steamer from Benicia Barracks, taking ample supplies for the prosecution of a vigorous campaign. On reaching Fort Humboldt Colonel Black will assumed command of the district, and move promptly in pursuit of the hostile Indians who have been plundering and murdering the white people in the counties bordering on the Klamath, Salmon, and Trinity Rivers. I have ordered that all Indians captured or who surrender themselves shall be sent to Fort Humboldt and held securely as prisoners of war until the Government shall determine as to their final disposition. As I have before reported, it is useless to place these Indians on reservations in that country; but if they can be sent to Catalina Island they cannot escape, and the expense of maintaining them there will be very trifling. Colonel Black is an officer of much experience and great energy, and, with an ample force, well supplied, I look with confidence to an early settlement of the Indian disturbances in the District of Humboldt. Colonel Black's regiment numbers about 500 men well officered and efficient, and I hope it will not be deemed necessary to consolidate it and thereby throw out some of the best officers in the department. Six companies are now fully organized, and recuiting for the other four is progressing. Independent of these Indian distrubances, I have nothing special to report. Peace and quiet reign throughout the department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT.

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.