War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0719 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

mining and the others engaged in stock raising. There are about 20,000 sheep and 1,000 horses and cattle on the island. There are twelve or fifteen small valleys embracing an area of 1,000 or 1,200 acres of good fertile land. The island has on it a large number of wid goats, estimated at 15,000, besides quail and small game. It has an abundant supply of fresh running water, which can easily be conducted to any part of the island. Since it was known that I had ordered military possession of the whole island, and notified all persons to leave it within a specified time, I have been appealed to by several parties claiming the right to mine on the island; but as they had biot been worked very vigorously I did not suppose that any companies had been incorporated for that locality under the laws of California. Under these circumstances I have modified my instructions to the effect that mining companies duly incorporated according to law and located on the island may continue to work their claims until the decision of the Government shall be known, provided that such companies were actually incorporated before the date of my order directing possession to be taken.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

FEBRUARY 20, 1864.

Answer General Wright that Department of the Interior has been requested to have this island made an Indian reservation.

H. W. H.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, January 8, 1864.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY,

Washington, D. C.:

SIR: The First Infantry washington Territory Volunteers being reduced to one-half the maximum number prescribed by law, I have ordered the regiment to be consolidated into five companies, under the requirements of General Orders, Numbers 86, from your office, dated April 2, 1863. The First Cavalry Oregon Volunteers is also reduced to one-half the maximum organization, but as there are now only seven companies in the regiment, and bearing in mind that the field officers and staff of the regiment were originally appointed by the War Department, I have as yet given no orders for consolidation. The Second Cavalry and Fourth Infantry California Volunteers being below the minimum organization, the vacancy of colonel in each of those regiments remains open. The First Cavalry California Volunteers being above the minimum, the colonel of that regiment, lately appointed by the Governor, has been mustered into the service. The Sixth Infantry California Volunteers is still in progress of organization. Recruiting parties from the different volunteer regiments have been ordered to report to the superintendent in this city, and I am in hopes of procuring quite a number of men who would prefer volunteering to running the chance of being drafted. All the volunteer regiments in this department have a reduced number of commissioned officers, none being appointed beyong those necessary to command the reduced number of the rank and file.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.