War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0717 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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Utah, ask that General Connor with his soldiers be removed from the Territory and the people restored to their former rights of water and pasturage and permitted to enjoy undisturbed the blessings which God and nature have given them as the pioneer settles of the distant valleys of the Rocky Mountains? Will you please honor me with a copy of such decision as the honorable Secretary of War may make in the premises?

I have the honor, to be, with sentiments of respect, your obedient servant,

JOHN F. KINNEY.

[Indorsement.]

Respectfully referred to Brigadier-General Connot for report.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, January 5, 1864.

Brigadier General G. WRIGHT,

San Francisco, cal.:

The right of way for a macadamized road to Fort Point is granted. Instructions will be sent from Adjutant-General's Office.

By order of the Secretary of War:

ED. R. S. CANBY,

Brigadier-General and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, Cal. January 5, 1864.

Captain A. W. STARR,

Second Cav. California Vols., Commanding Camp Bidwell, Chico, Cal.:

SIR: It is apprehended that an attack may be made by the Indians living on Mill Creek, in Tehama County, in this State, and as these are the most troublesome Indians in the country controlled by your troops, the general commanding desires you, if possible, to get hold of the leading men among them and send them to Alcatraz Island for confinement.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, January 5, 1864.

OFFICER COMMANDING CAMP WRIGHT,

Round Valley:

SIR: Mr. Steele, superintendent of Indianaffairs for the Norther District of California, has had an interview with the general commanding relative to the difficulties existing between the military and Indian authorities at Round Valley. The general desires me to say that it is important that harmony should prevail between the military and Indian departments, and thet he expects you to afford every assistance to the Indian agent in retaining the Indians on the reservation. When called