War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0665 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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In giving my opinion with regard to the first proposition, it is proper for me to state that the lateness of the season prevented me from making a personal examination of the country which surrounds the Klamath Lake Valley. The information which I obtained concerning this region was collected verbally from many individuals who have partly explored it, and from the official reports of those officers who have partly surveyed it. I have conversed with some twenty persons living in and about Jacksonville and Yreka, all of whom seemed to have partly surveyed it. I have conversed with some twenty persons living in and about Jacksonville and Yreka, all of whom seemed to have more or less personal knowledge of this country, and althugh I found some difference with regard to their statements, the conclusion at which I have arrived is based upon that which I considered the best and most reliable information offered. There can be no question as to the fitness of the place selected for this new fort, if the only considerations are the health of the troops and economy in their support. It also appears equally clear that as a strategic position, taken for the purpose of holding in subjection Indians that are considered hostile, it offers very many advantages. Indeed, with the limited means at Colonel Drew's disposal for the construction of a new fort in that section of the country, it is hardly possible that one could have been located which would have afforded greater advantages and have secured like protection to emigrants and to citizens.

With regard to the second proposition I have only to say that Colonel Drew pronounces as wholly untrue the language which Sub-Agent Rogers had imputed to him. Colonel Drew claims that he has ever been willing and ready to co-operation would have added to the public safety or have reflected credit upon either department. I am of the opinion that no case can be cited-at least I have heard of non-where co-operation was refused, which, if closely examined, will draw censure upon Colonel Drew's conduct or reflect indiscretion upon his judgment. I have listened to many compalints against Colonel Drew made by respectable citizens in Jacksonville. These compalints have reference to the manner in which the troops in that vicinity have been supplied and to the persons who have supplied and to the persons who have supplied them. After giving the subject that careful consideration which the case demanded, I could only arrive at the conclusion that the cause for complaint was more apparent than real. The citizens understand but little with regard to the mode of supplying troops; therefore transactions which in themselves are strictly proper, and which save the Government much unnecessary expense, excite their suspicion, and call forth from them remarks which have not the slightest foundation in reason or fact; and this is more specially the case when a person whose political faith is a question with a portion of the community is in any way engaged in supplying troops; therefore transactions which in themselves are strictly proper, and which save the Government much unnecessary expense, excite their suspicion, and call forth from them remarks which have not the slightest foundation in reason or fact; and this is more specially the case when a person whose political faith is a question with a portion of the community is in any way engaged in supplying troops. I find in this case but one person, a Mr. Glenn, who is know in any contract against whom objection is made, and that on account of sympathies which it is said, he has with the rebellion. This person, however, has taken the oath of allegiance, and is in partnership with one whose Union sentiments none dare asperse. With regard to Mr. Glenn's loyalty Colonel Drew has ben the judge, and Ihave had no proofs offered to me which were sufficient to induce me to believe him disloyal.

Before closing these remakrs with regard to the complaints of th-Indian agent and citizens against Colonel Drew it is becoming upon me to state that I have not considered it necessary to mention in this report all the facts and all the statements which have induced me to the conclusions I have formed. I trust I have given the matter a careful, thorough, and impartial investigation. That there exists in the