War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0658 OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST. Chapter LXII.

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FORT TEJON, CAL., October 27, 1863.

Major E. SPARROW PURDY, U. S. Army,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of instructions dated headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, October 13, 1863, and beg leave to state, for the information of the general commanding the department, that no issue of commissary stores have been made to Indians by my order or of my knowledge since they were turned over to the Indian authorities at the Sebastian Reserve.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. A. McLAUGHLIN,

Captain, Second Cavalry California Volunteers, Commanding.

FORT TEJON, CAL., October 27, 1863.

Major E. SPARROW PURDY, U. S. Army,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to transmit herewith, for the information of the general commanding, copy of Superintendent Wentworth's leter addressed to me, and in reply to your letter of instructions of October 18, 1863, I beg leave to state that the Indians have been encamped near this post since about the 3rd of the present month. The Indians do not interfere with the command, and are sufficiently near for the proper supervision.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. A. McLAUGHLIN,

Captain, Second Cavalry California Volunteers, Commanding.

[Inclosure.] EL TEJON, September 30, 1863.

Captain M. A. McLAUGHLIN,

Commanding Fort Tejon:

CAPTAIN: I accept you officer of to-day to receive the Owen's River Indians at Fort Tejon, as I deem their longer stay at this place hazardous in the extreme to both life and property, and will make arrangements to have them rationed at that place through my superivisor with such provisions as the limited means places at my disposal by Government will admit of.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO P. H. WENTWORTH,

Superintendent Indian Affairs, Southern District of California.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UTAH,

Great Salt Lake City, October 27, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, San Francisco, Cal.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to inform the department commander that I have just returned from Camp Connor, Idaho, where, in connection with Governor Doty, acting superintendent of Indian affairs, a final treaty of peace was concluded with the last remaining band of Shoshone Indians, and that on the 12th instant another treaty was made in Tooele Valley by the deputy superintendent and an officer of my staff, acting for Governor Doty and myself, with some 250 of the Goshute