War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0641 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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must observe to Your Excellency that as the port regulations require that "all ships shall be brought to and their character ascertained on entering the outer harbor," and it is admitted that this regulation was not complied with, owing to the temporary withdrawal of the steamer appointed to carry out that duty and the absence of the two boats at the disposal of the commandant examining other ships, the act which I have had to bring under your notice has resulted from no disregard of the port regulations on my part, as I was not made acquainted with them, and I must express my regret that no acknowledgment has been offered for this disregard of the courtesies usually extended toward the ships of war of all friendly nations. I have learned for the first time from Captain Winder's report that the anchorage of Saucelito is an unusual one, as I am given to understand that until within late years it was resorted to not only by foreign men-of-war, but also by ships of was of the United States. The day when Her Majesty's ship Sutley entered this harbor was calm, as will be seen by Captain Winder's report, and a period of nearly two hours must have elapsed from the time this ship was first made out by the fort as an armed ship until the shotted gun was fired. It is therefore clear that ample time was afforded for any boat to board and ascertain our character and neutrality, and I beg to add that had I known the port regulations I most certainly should not have attempted to infringe them them in any way.

I have the honor to be, sir, your humble servant,

JOHN KINGCOME,

Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS HUMBOLDT MILITARY DISTRICT, Fort Humboldt, Cal., October 7, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel R. C. DRUM, U. S. Army,

Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco:

COLONEL: Many reports of Indian depredations in this military district, I observe, are published in the San Francisco papers from time to time, which are often the first intimation we have here that anything unusual is occurring. Frequently these rumors are unduly exaggerated, therefore therefore I respectfully submit that it will always be possible to send advices from these headquarters to department headquarters in three or four days, should extraordinary circumstances arise requiring it.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. G. WHIPPLE,

Lieutenant Colonel First Battalion Mountaineers, California Vols.,

Commanding Humboldt Military District.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 8, 1863.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I beg leave most respectfully to ask the attention of the General-in-Chief and the honorable Secretary of War to the practicability of locating a good wagon road between Fort Dalles, Oreg., in a southeasterly direction, via Canyon City, to Fort Boise, Idaho Ter., and thence to the navigable waters of the Yellowstone, near the mouth of

41 R R-VOL L, PT II