War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0637 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 2, 1863.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: For the information of the General-in-Chief and War Department, I have the honor to report that, independent of occasional Indain disturbances, quiet prevails throughout this department. The late elections indicate, unmistakably, the feeling of a wast majority of the people on this coast, assuring the Government the hearty support of a loyal people to crush a rebellion which aims at the dissolution of the Union. The people on this coast, although far removed from the scenes of war, and really experiencing none of its hardships, yet have a deep-rooted affection for the Union, and will nobly stand by the Administration in the prosecution of the war until flag shall wave in triumph over the whole country. I have but few Indian distrubances to speak of. In the State of Oregon, as well as in the Territories of Washington, Idaho, Navada, and Utah we have peace and quiet between the races. In the northeastern portion of California the condition of our Indian affairs has not materially changed. Constant depredations by small bands involves the necessity of keeping our troops on the move. I cannot promise peace between the whites and Indians in the District of Humboldt without the removal of the latter to some reservation in the soutehrn portion of the State where they cannot get back to their old haunts. This has been the difficulty experienced during the last few years. Our military forces have gathtered up a large number of Indians and transferred them to the superintendent of Indian affairs, by whom they have been placed on the different reservations within the district, but it has been found impossible to keep them there. They escape, return to their old familiar grounds, and frequently engage again in depredations upon the settlements. I have just been asked by Lieutenant-Colonel Whipple as to the disposition to be made of his Indian prisoners; that is, the active young warriors, who can only be kept in that district by being held constantly under a guard, fed and clothed by the Government without rendering any service. After consideration I have determined to bring twenty of these able-bodied Indians down here and make them work on the fortifications now being erected on Angel Island and other points around the city. If the plan succeeds, and these Indians are found to be of service, I will bring more of them here, where they can at least render a return for the food and clothing necessary for them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 3, 1863.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: We are much in want of officers of the Regular Army on this caost. So many officers are necessarily employed mustering in volunteers and other duties that it leaves hardly an officer with each company. I shall be glad if you can conveniently send out some of the officees of the Third Artillery and Ninth Infantry, now in the East.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.