War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0621 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., September 18, 1863.

Governor STANFORD:

Orders have been sent Colonel Whipple to give necessary protection; also to Captain Mellen to send a detachment from Fort Crook. I cannot reach Whipple by telegraph.

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., September 18, 1863.

Captain MELLEN,

Second Cavalry, Fort Crook:

(Via Red Bluffs.)

Indians are murdering on Trinity River. Take twenty men and proceed in that direction to protect persons and property.

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TRANS-MISSISSIPPI, Shreveport, La., September 18, 1863.

Hon. JAS. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Judge Hastings, of California, comes to me with propositions of a nature in which, whilst I acknoledge their importance, I do not feel authorized to act. I have directed him to proceed to Richmond and lay the matter before the President. He there expects to present vouchers for his position and character which cannot be obtained here.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Camp Drum, September 20, 1863.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR,

Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to state that this station has been built upon thirty acres of ground, donated and deeded to the United States by Mr. Phineas Banning, of Wilmington, Cal. ; that there are upon it and belonging to the United States quarteres for officers and men of five companies, a commanding officer's quarters, hospital, cavalry stables, a stone magazine, ordnance store-house, brick bakery, guard house, stables, and offices; that it is the headquarters of the District of Southern California, comprising all the south part of the State to the Mexican boundary and nearly one-half the area of the State; that it is distant twenty miles from Los Angeles, the largest town within 300 miles, and with one exception the largest in the State south of San Francisco; that it is one mile from the landing of the post of Wilmington, which is two days and a halt's steam from San Francisco, and with which it communicates thrice each month; that it is a desirable base for operations throughout the district and into the neighboring Mexican States; that the major portion of the population of the vicinity is of Spanish descent and speak that language; that any change of name would perplex those people