War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0608 OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST. Chapter LXII.

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date to Mr. R. W. Creel, of Chihauhua, and Mr. Kimmey, U. S. vice-consul, at Monterey. * I believe if feasible to organize at least two companies of mounted men from the Texan refuges spoken of by Mr. Kimmey in his letter to General Carleton, and respectfully invite his serious consideration to the subject. Such a force would be very effective on this frontier, either for purpose of observation or to make an offensive movement upon a small scale. To save time I took the liberty of making some inquiries to this end of Mr. Kimmey. Trusting the general commanding will approve.

I am, captain, your obedient servant,

J. R. WEST,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERES,

HEADQUARTERS, No. 139.

Tucson, Ariz. Ter., September 7, 1863.

The undersgined hereby relinquishes the command of this post to Lieutenant Colonel T. A. Coult, Fifth Infantry California Volunteers.

WM. FFRENCH,

Captain, Fifth Infantry California Volunteers.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS, No. 140.

Tucson, Ariz. Ter., September 7, 1863.

In accordance with Speical Orders, No. 38, headquarters Department of New Mexico, the undersigned hereby assumes command of what is known as the District of Western Arizona and the post of Tucson.

THEO. A. COULT,

Lieutenant-Colonel Fifth Infantry California Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS HUMBOLDT MILITARY DISTRICT, Fort Humboldt, September 7, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel RICHARD C. DRUM,

Asst. Adjt. General, Department of the Pacific, San Francisco:

COLONEL: I have the honor to represent that the exigencies of the service require that Camp Baker should be abandoned and a new camp established some fifteen miles northwest of the present site, and that distance nearer Fort Humboldt. Having just returned from an eight days' tour in that direction I am able to speak of the necessity of this change from my own personal knowledge. Camp Baker is situated about fifty miles southeasterly from this post, on a branch making of Van Dusen's Creek; is surrounded by high mountains, making it unapproachable a great portion of the winter season. There are no Indians inhabiting the country about Camp Baker within a day's march, while all the white settlements to be protected by the force stationed there are north and west from the camp. At the time Camp Baker was established aninfluential citizen had large herds upon the ranch on which the camp is located, but during they year past no cattle have been there except those belonging to Government. If there ever was a good cause for the continued presence of troops at that point it is not necessary now. The place selected in lieu of Camp Baker is in