War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0607 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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precedes your advices of his coming. He is generally accompanied by one or two men; the party stays a few days and returns. I am convinced that his mission is to watch our movements, and that his reports of troops coming against us are merely thrown out to conceal his own designs. I send you an open letter* to the U. S. vice-consul at Monterey, which please read and forward. I shall detain your express until the arrival of our next mail from Santa Fe, in hopes of being able to send you leter news from the seat of war. Pray continue your advices by every opportunity.

I am, sir, with much respect, your obedient servant,

J. R. WEST,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARIZONA, Hart's Mill, Tex., September 7, 1863.

M. M. KIMMEY, Esq.,

U. S. Vice-Consul, Monterey, Mexico:

MY DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 15th of August last, with information of the rebel forces in Texas, and that considerable cotton was being collected at Eagle Pass. The movement from here which you suggested to capture this cotton has been referred to General Carleton, commanding the Department of New Mexico. Should it not be undertaken at present, I would thank you to continue your advices, in order that action may be taken upon the latest information. I had but a few moments prior to the departure of the Northern mail in which to peruse your open letter to General Carleton. On his behalf I take advantage of this express to inquire of your whether the loyal Texas refugees, whom you represent as desirous of enlisting in the U. S. service, can be forwarded to this point by way of Chihauhua and El Paso, Mexico. The bounty which each man would receive upon enlisting would much more than defray any advanced that it would be necessary for your to make. Should you make such advance for expenses to any man who would upon his arrival refuse to enlist he could be sent back to you, a measure that would be quite sure to prevent loss to you. I believe it to be out of the question to give assurance that men so enlisted would only be held to service in the State of Texas, but the great expense of removing them from this frontier would effecutally prevent their being sent elsewhere, while in case of any movement hence toward the interior of Texas they chould count which every confidenc eupon being called upon to form part of it. I would be much pleased to have you give this subject your consideration and to advise General Carleton of your ability to do as I have suggested.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. R. WEST,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARIZONA, Hart's Mill, Tex., September 7, 1863.

Captain BEN. C. CUTLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Santa Fe.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to transmit herewith, for the information of the commanding general, certified copies of my letters of this

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*See next, post.

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