War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0547 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

hostile vessel from taking a position in front of the city, should be succeed in passing Fort Point and Alactraz Island without serious damage. I heard some time since that the Government proposed to purchase a couple of steamships, arm them, and place them in the harbor. Whatever is done should be done quickly. Can you not place the old Independence, with a heavy armament, in front of the city? I have though that she might be of great service there, with a powerful steam tug to assist her movements. But I must recollect that I know really nothing at all about ships, and my remarks are only the random thoughts of a soldier, and no sailor. In a short time I will do myself the honor of paying my respects to you at the Navy Yard.

With high regard, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT.

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding

SPECIAL ORDERS.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC. Numbers 180.

San Francisco, Cal., July 31, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel Albemarle Cady, Seventh Infantry, is hereby relieved from duty in this department agreeably to instructions from the War Department.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM.

Assistant Adjutant-General

SAN FRANCISCO, July 31, 1863

Captain STARR,

Second Cavalry, Chico, Cal.:

Remain where you are until further orders, giving necessary protection to whites and friendly Indians.

R. C. DRUM.

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SALT LAKE, July 31, 1863. - 7. 35 p. m.

Colonel R. C. DRUM:

Made treaty with remaining bands of Snake Indians yesterday. Muster-rolls have already been forwarded.

P. E. CONNOR

Brigadier-General,

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC.

San Francisco, Cal., July 31, 1863.

Brigadier General P. E. CONNOR, U. S. Volunteers,

Commanding District of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah Ter.:

GENERAL: The department commander has it in contemplation to reoccupy Fort or Camp Crittenden as the principal military post in the District of Utah. Several considerations have induced the general to believe that is the most eligible position for the mass of the troops, both for the protection of the overland route, which is the principal object of the Government in sending a force into Utah and giving general security to persons and property therein. The general desires you to make immediate preparations to this end, ascertaining through disinterested parties at what the buildings, &c., could possibly be obtained and when possession could be given. Should the terms be