War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0408 OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST. Chapter LXII.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, Numbers 101.

San Francisco, Cal., April 20, 1863.

1. Lieutenant Colonel Harvey Lee, Fourth Infantry California Volunteers, will turn over the command of Fort Yuma without delay to the next officer in rank, and report in person at these headquarters.

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By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, Cal., April 20, 1863.

Captain C. D. DOUGLAS,

Second Infantry California Volunteers,

Commanding Camp Wright, Round Valley, Cal.:

SIR: The measures adopted for the protection of public property in Round Valley and to be in readiness for any action of a hostile character on the part of the secession element in that part of the State are approved by the general commanding. The general desires you to be watchful of the movements of secessionists, and, if possible, to discover their designs.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

OFFICE SUPERINTENDENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

Salem, Oreg., April 20, 1863.

General BENJAMIN ALVORD,

Commanding District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: Since the reception of your letter of the 16th instant I have given its contents careful consideration, and after thoroughly reviewing the whole subject see no sufficient reaosn to change the opinion which I expressed in our interview of the 13th instant as to my authority to act as commissioner to treat with the Nez Perces. By examining the copies herewith transmitted of letters on file in this office you will observe that the Secretary of the Interior, July 19, 1862, directs that William H. Rector, superintendent of Indian affairs in Oregon, Calvin H. Hale, superintendent of Indian affairs, Washington Territory, and Charles Hutchins, agent for the Nez Perces, be apponted commissioners to negotiate the treaty, and that the Commissioner of Indian Affairs July 24, 1862, notifies Mr. Rector that he, in connection with the other gentlemen named, has been appointed to negotiate a treaty with those Indians. The authority thus conferred upon Mr. Rector was to perform certain duties outside of his superintendency, duties which he could not have assumed unless specifically appointed a commissioner, and which it appears to me he might have refused to perform without resigning his office. In relieving Mr. Rector and assuming the duties of this office, I of course assumed all the duties which devolved on him in the capacity of superintendent, but not those extra-official powers which were conferred on him as commissioner. If Mr. Rector chose to appear at the council ground next month, and under his appointment as commissioner proceed to assist at the treaty, could any one gainsay his authority? I think not. And if that authority is yet vested in him, it certainly has not devolved on any one else. I am fully aware of the