War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0396 Chapter LXII. OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST.

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TUSCON, ARIZ. TER., April 14, 1863.

Lieutenant J. F. BENNETT,

First Infantry California Vols., Actg. Asst. Adjt. General,

Headquarters District of Arizona, Hart's Mill, Tex.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that express for Las Cruses leaves this evening. I inclose my Special Orders, Numbers 68, on the subject. I have sent a wagon load of grain away this morning-one-third of it to be left at San Pedro, guarded by a sergeant and nine men of Company K, Fifthe Infantry California Volunteers; for the cavalry at this post, except one man whose horse is not able to go and another who has no horse, are ordered to Fort Bowie. This party consists of one sergeant, two corporals, and six privates. I have been obliged to direct the hiring of three citizens to go with two mounted infantrymen to bring the first express Fort Bowie, as the horses of the party to be statined there are not able to stand the fatigue necessary until hay is put in at San Pedro Crossing. The infantry at San Pedro can be relieved by Captain Wellman's detachment of eleven men, which will leave no cavalry at this post, rendering it necessary to hire citizens until some arrive either from the east or west, and also preventing a compliance with instructions to relieve the men of Company B, Second Cavalry California Volunteers, east of Fort Yuma, of whom there are thirteen. It is high time they were relieved; their animals are used up. They are accused of tampering with the mails-abstracting newspapers and opening letters coming from the west. No way bill is sent from Fort Yuma, the officers at that post being respesented by almost every one coming thence as too much engaged (or at least the majority of them) consuming whisky. It is my opinion that at least a force of twenty men, ten cavalry and ten infantry, should be at San Pedro and Miembres stations. The life of one man is not for a moment safe at either of these places. The Indians have been very busy lately in this vicinity. They have on several occasions stolen citizens' cattle from San Xavier and Tuscon, the most of which have been recovered, but last week they carried away about forty head from San Xiavier. They also captured a train of twenty-eight mules belonging to Mexicans hauling freight from Fort Yuma. This was at the Picacho, en route to Pima Villages. The vedette force at tall the stations east of Gila Bend should be doubled, including Gila Gend. This I have no force to do. Paragraph VI of General Orders, Numbers 5, District of Arizona, is copied and given to Sergeant Andrews and copy sent to the commanding officer at Fort Bowie.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. FERGUSSON,

Colonel First Cavalry-California Volunteers, Commanding.

TUSCON, ARIZ. TER., April 14, 1863.

Lieutenant J. F. BENNETT,

First Infantry California Vols, Actg. Asst. Adjt. General,

Headquarters District of Arizona, Hart's Mill, Tex.:

SIR: Inclosed is a copy of a letter* from commanding officer at Fort Yuma, notifying that Company I, Fifth Infantry, left that post on the 4the instant. Campain F french's company (D), of the same, was still at Fort Yuma, and unofficially reported as awaiting the arrival of Colonel Bowie and the band of the Fifth Infantry California Volunteers before

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* Omited.

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