War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0393 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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the above-named property, returning it when called for. The quartermaster will be instructed to nitify you when ordnance and stores will be in radiness to be turned over to the person you may authorize to receive them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, Numbers 16.

San Francisco, April 14, 1863.

I. Lieutenant Colonel George H. Ringgold is, agreeably to regulations established in General Orders, Numbers 48, of February 25, 1863, detailed commissary of musters for this department.

II. Captain Joshep Stewart, Third Artillery, will in addition to his duties as judge-advocate, discharge those of chief of artillery for this department. He will frequently inspect the fortifications guarding the approaches to San Francisco, assurning himself that the instrucitons contained in General Orders, Numbers 45, dated February 16, 1863, are fully complied with.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAMP BABBITT,

Near Visalia, April 14, 1863.

Colonel R. C. DRUM, U. S. Army,

Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to report than on the night of the 9th instant it came to my knowledge that the celebrated war chief Joaquin Jim had, arrived from Owen's Valley, and was at a rencheria near the foothills, about seventeen miles east of this camp. On the morning of the 10the I ordered Lieutenant William L. Knight, of Company I, with four men to the place where Joaquin Jim was reported to have been the day before, and capture him and birng him to this camp. Lieutenant Knight arrived at the house of Mr. Ogden about 10 o'clock, and there learned that the Indian was at the rancheria, about half a mile from Mr. Ogden's. Lieutenant Knight immediately reparired to the rancheria, but Jim was not to be found, but was told that Jim had gone to a ranch, Mr. Ogden going with him. When they got on the ranch and were going into the garden the Indian espied them and ran to a deep shough and swam across, Lieutenant Knight, with his, men, rode in the slough and swam across. Lieutenant Knight, with his men, rode in the shoung, swam their horses across, and after, and after a race of nearly half a mile, during which time he tired five shots from his pistol, three of them taking effect, which effectually stopped his further progress, sending his spirit to the land of his fathers, where he will trouble the white man no more. Joaquin Jim had the evidence of having been in the late battle at Ownen's Lake, having received a gunshot wound under the right shoulder balde, and had already begun to turn black around the wound. They told Mr. Ogded the day before that he was in the battle last spring at the head of Owen's Valley. He had an old would on the back of his head that he received in the battle last spring that had not yet healed up. This accounts for the fact that he did not come into Camp Independence last spring at the time the treaty was made.