War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0345 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

March 11, 1863.

Brigadier-General WRIGHT,

Sacramento, Cal.:

Secretary gives authority to muster in six companies requested in your dispatch yesterday.

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

SAN FRANCISCO, March 11, 1863.

Adjt. General L. THOMAS,

Washington, D. C.:

Excitement at Salt Lake. Brigham Young raised nation colors on his house and called his people to arms. Colonel Connor and troops cool and waiting events. He will telegraph direct to you if anything important takes place.

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDEQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, Numbers 65.

San Francisco, Cal., March 11, 1863.

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2. Paragraph 8 of Special Orders, Numbers 51, directing the change of station of Company D, Second Cavalry California Volunteers, is hereby revoked.

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By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SAN FRANCISCO, March 11, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Pacific Division:

SIR: In reply to your instructions to furnish you with such information as I possess with regard to the region in the vicinity of the Klamath Lakes, I have the honor to report that in 1855 I went with a surveying party through a large portion of the country referred to, and the results of that reconnaissance are to be found in the sixth volume of the Pacific Raliroad Surveys, pages 28, 66, 67, 68, 76, and 77, and in the geological reprort in the same volume, PAGE38. The information now required is with a view of selecting a spot suitable for a military post, and I am informed that a point on Klamath River between the lower and upper Lakes is thought of as suitable for the purpose. My recollection of that locality is that it is very barren and nearly destitute of timber. The water of the lakes is of a dark color and disagreeable taste, and that of the river which connects them must be of the same character. Still, a spot may possible be found that would answer the purpose. A far better locality is to be found in the vicinity of Camp 30 (see map), on Klamath River, some three or four miles from its entrance into the upper lake. There is there a beautiful valley, with open prairie near the banks, and forests of pines and spurce near