War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0321 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON,

Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., February 21, 1863.

COMMANDING OFFICER FORT HOSKINS, OREG.:

SIR: The general commanding the district has recommended that Fort Haskins be abandoned. If this is approved the general instaucts me to say to you that company will probably from part of the expeditionary force to the Boise region. the date at which you will have to leave cannot now be stated, but you are directed to hold yurself in readiness. You will probably have to more in three or four weeks.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FEDERICK MEARS,

First Lieutenant, Ninth Infantry, U. S. Army, Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, Febraury 23, 1863.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY,

Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a communication addressed to me by His Excellency Leland Stanford, Governor of the State of California, for the consideration of the War Department*. In connection with the subject of the Governor's letter, I deem it proper to say to the Department that the authority given to individuals to raise troops in this State, independent of the executive authority, and to send them to the theater of war as a portion of the quota from another State, has not been regarded favorably by the peopl. This feeling, however, will not prevent the prompt organization of the companies called for. The great anxiety amongst these people is for active service in the field, and if they cannot go as California troops they will seek service under any call which will cary them to the battle-field.

The Executive, the Legislature, and a large majority of the people of California are eminently patriotic and devoted to the Union. Far removed from the scense of war, yet they manifest a deep interest in the cause; they have exhibited their feelings of sympathy for our suffering soldiers in the East by mangnificient contributions of money, and should a requisition be made for men to go East such a call would be most cheerfully responded to. The subject of military instruction, both theriotical and practical, and the organization of militia companies is at this moment receiving the earnest attention of the Executive and State Legislature. Isolated as she is from her sister States, California feels the importance-absolute necessity-of making preparation to meet any emergency; she asks through her Executive arms for the loyal companies now being organized in every town; she asks that the harbor of San Francisco, her great emporium, shall be made impregnable; and then, relying on the stout hearts of her brave people, she will defy all enemies. Permit me again to ask that at least 10,000 stand of small-arms and equipements may be sent to Benecia at an early date.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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* See January 25, p. 292.

21 R R-VOL L, PT II

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