War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0297 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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their rancheria is worthy of all commendation. The task of Captain McCleave and his men, though fully as well accomplished, was less arduous; yet I am not fail to be convinced that both he and they wouuld have cheerfully and successfully encountered any difficulties that might have interposed between them and their object. I left the command at Fort McLane on the 23rd instant actively preparing for alenghtened scout against the Indians toward the headwaters of the Gila River. The general commanding may rest assured that in the terms of his order the punishment of the Indians will be thorough and sharp, and that the commander of the force intrusted with the duty, Captain William McCleave, First Cavalry California Volunteers, will not disappoint this expectations.

I am, captain, with due respect, your obedient servant,

J. R. WEST,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

SAN FRANCISCO, January 29, 1863.

Adjt. General L. THOMAS,

Washington, D. C.:

Can the District of Arizona be transferred to Department of New Mexico?

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

COMMANDANT'S OFFICE, NAVY-YARD,

Mare Island, Cal., January 29, 1863.

Brigadier-General WRIGHT,

Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Your communication of the 26th instant relating tothedefenses of the city of San Francisco was received this morning. The necessity of being prepared to meet any aggresion, come from what quarter it may, is highly important, but I have no control of any vessels of war beyond the limits of the yard. In cases of emergency I should not, however, hesitate to assume any responsibility necessary for the public welfare. The Independence is the only vessel suitable for mounting heavy guns as the yard and which would be effective as a floating battery, and she is now used as barracks for the marines. It would occupy some time with our means to put her in conditon for service as a floating battery, and it is doubtful whether I could obtain a crew for her at San Francisco. The only steamer we have here is the Saginaw, undergoing repairs which will be completed in four or six weeks. I would suggest that the State of California or the city of San Francisco purchase a steamer, iron-clad, and arm her for harbor defenses. The Cyane, sailing ship, is on her way to this place, where she probably will arrive about the 20th of next month. On her arrival, if it is necessary, I will direct the commander to lie in the harbor of San Francisco prepared to co-operate with the fort against any attempt to enter the harbor by a rebel steamer. I shall send the admiral a copy of your letter and advise him of the necessity of keeping a man-of-war ready for immediate service in these waters.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. O. SELFRIDGE,

Commandant.