War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0226 Chapter LXII. OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST.

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been occuped by U. S. troops, or formerly by the Mexican Government, and such places as can be secured without positive injury or inconvenience to the loyal citizens within your district.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, Cal., November 15, 1862.

Colonel F. J. LIPPITT,

Second Ifantry California Volunteers,

Commanding District of Humboldt:

SIR: In executing the instructions contained in letters to yourself and the officer in command at Round Valley, directing assistance to be rendered to the supervisor of Indian affairs in removing intruders from the reservation, the general commanding the department desires you to exercise great discretion. The superintendent represents that many very deserving settlers are willing to be removed; therefore so long as these continue to behave properly they will not be removed at an unsuitable or inclement season, nor will harsh measures be applied to them when the proper time of their removal arrives.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[NOVEMBER 16, 1862. - For Carleton to Lorenzo Thomas, in regard to threatened ivasion of New Mexico by Confederate forces under Baylor, see Vol XV, p. 597.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, November 17, 1862.

Brigadier General L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith a communication addressed to these headquarters by Brigadier General B. Alvord, commanding the District of Oregon, dated the 4th instant,* with nine inclosures. The report of General Alvord, with accompanying documents, will fully inform the General-in-Chief of the state of affairs in the district, especially in relation to the Nez Perce Indians and the reservation set apart for them by treaty stipulations. I have fully approved of all that General Alvord has done and proposes to do to maintain the peace and quiet of that country. The large and constantly increasing number of miners in the Nez Perce country can only be held under proper restraint by the strong arm of military power. The Nez Perces have been our steadfast friends for more than half a century; they rendered me essential aid in my campaign against the northern Indians in 1858, and still later they have yielded to the encroachments of a multitude of miners, who have overrun nearly their entire reservation, asking only that they may receive protection from the Government in their just rights, and that the white intruders may be held under proper restraint. This must be done; and other means failing, I shall not hesitate to declare martial law over the entire reservation, and strictly enforce the

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* See p. 206.

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