War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0219 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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person will be molested or interfered with in any manner whatsover by the military authorities except when it shall become necessary in order to carry out the objects above declared.

FRANCIS J. LIPPITT,

Colonel, Commanding Humboldt Military District.

HEADQUARTERS HUMBOLDT MILITARY DISTRICT,

Fort Humboldt, November 10, 1862.

OFFICE INDIAN AFFAIRS, NORTHERN DIST. OF CALIFORNIA,

San Francisco, November 11, 1862.

General G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding:

SIR: I am just in receipt of another letter from Round Valley from Supervisor Short, in which he says: "No troops have yet come and no news of them. " David Jordan has come into the valley with six or eight barrels of whisky, and I know we will have trouble here as long as it lasts. " "There was a Peter McWilliams started out of the valley last Monday with a little Indian child about four years old; " (hearing of it) "I got out a writ for him and started a constable after him, who caught hm at the McCord camp and brought him and the child back; had a trial and was acquitted. He proved by Mr. Witt he got the child by consent of its parents: Witt done the talking" (interpreted, I suppose). The foregoing paragraphs are taken from the supervisor's letter of the 4th instant, which demonstrates more than ever the importance of martial law in the valley. The reason I quote these facts is, Mr. Short also says in his letter: "The settlers have held a meeting and got up a remonstrance to General Wright against declaring martial law in the valley, or against their removal, setting forth their loyalty and good intentions. "

I wrote to the supervisor immediately after I received your letter of the 5th instant in relation to removal of settlers, informing him not to make the requisition until the weather would be favorable and they could have time to dispose of their produce, stock, &c., for the object was not to injure them, but to protect the rights of the Indians and Government property, &c. "Martial Law," I said to him, "was declared over the whole valley, as it was all a regularly surveyed Indian reservation, and reserved from sale or pre-emption, and map filed in the U. S. office here, all done by orders of U. S. authorities at Washington. " Hence, I have instructed him to require troops to arrest these Indian kidnapers, take or destroy the whisky brought in the valley to retail, &c., and for all other necessary purposes protecting the United States in its rights.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

GEORGE M. HANSON,

Superintendent, &c.

P. S. - Please say if I have done right in said instructions.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, Numbers 203,

San Francisco, Cal., November 12, 1862.

1. Lieutenant Colonel George W. Patten, Second Infantry, is, agreeably to instructions from the Adjutant-General's Office, relieved from duty in this department, and will proceed without delay to join his regiment.

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