War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0216 Chapter LXII. OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST.

Search Civil War Official Records

[Inclosure Numbers 4.] SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARIZONA, Numbers 73.

Mesilla, November 9, 1862.

Should an advance by the Rio Grande by rebel troops be threatened during the absence of Captain Nathaniel J. Pishon's expedition against the Indians, the commanding officer at Hart's Mill will immediately notify Captain Pishon to rejoin the main force in this district, and furnish him with every information essential to the execution of that step in a manner that will prevent his falling into he hands of the enemy.

J. R. WEST,

Colonel First Infantry California Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARIZONA,

Mesilla, November 9, 1862.

Captain BEN. C. CUTLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Santa Fe:

The postscript to instructions sent to Captain Pishon under this date will explain that I have discovered my mistake as to the general's design to have Garcia's party return while CAptain Pishon was in the field. * I would respectfully state that for some time after receiving the general's direction of October 2 to send a scout to the Hueco Tanks of an officer and twenty men "as soon as practicable," I had no force nor officer fit to send. Lieutenant Wardwell's detachment was recruiting, and before it could be sent on the duty named orders came to send it back to Tucson. I endeavored to get Lieutenant Baldwin off from here. He was so engaged with his papers that he could not leave. Meanwhile the orders for Captain Roberts' expedition came, and I concluded that the general had changed his plans. I now see my mistake, and regret it very much. My duty was plain, had I the means at command to have performed it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. R. WEST,

Colonel First Infantry California Volunteers, Commanding.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Carson City, Nev. Ter., November 9, 1862.

Brigadier-General WRIGHT,

Commanding Pacific Department:

SIR: I inclose you two articles clipped from the Sacramento Union of Saturday describing two bloody atrocities committed on the road between Honey Lake and Humboldt. They are very startling, and quite indicative of the intentions of the Indians for the coming winter. I do not know what to do. I have no money or rations to supply men with if we send them out. if we could have a company stationed in that vicinity for the winter they would be able to keep peace. If there is not, I am apprehensive of serious and constant trouble. While I write two of the representatives from the county of Humboldt are present and inform me that these depredations were committed on the road over which the supplies are taken into all that mining region, and will subject them to great inconvencience if they are not able to get

---------------

* See p. 214.

---------------