War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0095 Chapter LXII. CORRESPONDENCE-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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you will notify colonel commanding the district of the departure of the troops as speedily as possible.

By order of Colonel Lippitt.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. F. SWASEY,

1st Lieutenant and Regimental Quartemaster 2nd Infty. Cal. Vols.,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Humboldt Military District.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, Cal., September 1, 1862.

Captain GEORGE B. CURREY,

First Oregon Cavalry Volunteers:

(Through Brigadier-General Alvord, commanding District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.)

SIR: The general commanding the department has perused with much interest your report of operations in Grande Ronde Valley,* and desires me to express his satisfaction at and approval of the handsome manner in which the duties assigned you were executed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, September 1, 1862.

Brigadier General L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: Colonel Connor, with seven companies of Third Infnatry California Volunteers and three companies Second Cavalry, will reach Ruby Valley to-day en route for Salt Lake. The command is in good health, and under the admirable discipline established by Colonel Connor is perfectly reliable for any service required of it. From Brigadier-General Carleton I have no late official reports. He has a fine body of troops, probably now on the Rio Grande; I shall continue to throw forward supplies to meet all his wants. From the District of Oregon I have nothing special to report; all is quiet in the Indian country, and a strong cavalry force is on the road to protect the approaching overland emigration. In the District of Humboldt the Indian disturbances still continue; the troops under Colonel Lippitt, Second Infantry California Volunteers, are vigorously prosecuting hostilities; many Indians have been killed, and we have now some 800 at the different military stations who have eihter been captured or who have voluntarily surrendered. The superintendent of Indian affairs has made arrangements to have all these Indians placed on a reservation on Smith's River, in the northwest section of the State of California. The steamer which leaves here on the 5th instant will transport the Indians to Crescent City, near which point I have a battalion of the Second Infantry California Volunteers to take charge of them. I have brought down from Oregon the residue of the Second Infantry California Volunteers, and sent them to serve in the District of Humboldt. I have also brought down from Humboldt the three

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*See Part I, p. 164.

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