War of the Rebellion: Serial 106 Page 0026 OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST. Chapter LXII.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, Cal., July 18, 1862.

Brigadier General L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have nothing later from Brigadier General James H. Carleton than was communicated in my letters of the 9th and 10th instant. Inclosed herewith is a copy of a communication, under date of June 2, addressed to General Carleton by His Excellency Ignacio Pesqueira, Governor of the States of Sonora, in the Republic of Mexico. * Colonel P. Edward Connor, Third Infantry California Volunteers, marched on the 12th instant from his camp near Stockton with seven companies of his regiment, for the protection of the Overland Mail Route. The cavalry force designated for the same service willmove on the 21st instant and report to Colonel Connor after crossing the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, Numbers 123.

San Francisco, Cal., July 18, 1862.

* * * *

2. The headquarters and Companies L and K, Second Cavalry California Volunteers, will proceed by water to Sacramento on the 21st, and thence by the Henness Pass raoute to Fort Churchill.

3. Captain Richard L. Ogden, assistant quartermaster, will repair to Sacramento and superintend the organization of the wagon train intended for this command.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SAN SIMON, ARIZ. TER., July 18, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel J. R. WEST,

Tucson, Ariz. Ter.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to inform you in the late fight with the Indians at Apache Pass both of my stock-trails to my howitzers were broken or rendered almost useless on account of the great elevation required. One I think would not have broken were it not for a flaw in the iron strap around the axle-tree. Having fixed on a plan which I think will render the pieces fit for any service required of them, I send with Captain Roberts' permission one of my gunners with a trail and axle-tree. The gunner understands my plans fully, and with your sanction will carry them out. The plan is to raise the gun from the axles, so as to give more wood and strength to the stocks, and then strenthen them with iron plates. If you favor my plan I should like to have made a new trail and axle for the piece which remains here. I am in want of a few bolts, of which Monihon (the gunner) has a list. I also want some ammunition, having fired in the two days forty rounds, leaving me but sixty-five rounds. I would ask if it is possible for me to get pistols and sabers for my men, as it is useless to go in action

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*See Part I, p. 1117.

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