War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 1163 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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MARCH 27, 1865.

General LIDDELL:

The enemy attacked the left and center and drove in the skirmishers of the Reserves, but their main line was repulsed. The Reserves not very steady. The enemy is developing to the extreme left and toward the right.

R. L. GIBSON,

Brigadier-General.

MARCH 27, 1865.

General LIDDELL,

Blakely:

Why don't the gun-boat open on the enemy's right? It could do great good. All going well. Huger's fire helps us.

R. L. GIBSON,

Brigadier-General.

MARCH 27, 1865.

General LIDDELL:

After inspecting the lines carefully all day yesterday, I telegraphed you early in the night the result of our operations, &c. I have been able to discover nothing additional to-day. Wherever I could get spades for my skirmishers, they have held their ground though the enemy has approached nearer. Wherever the skirmishers did not have spades, they have retired within the main lines, and the enemy comes up as close as he can. I have said so much about the absolute necessity of an ample supply of entrenching tools that I will not annoy you any more. Our casualties are fewer to-day than yesterday, but my men of course, being up night and day and constantly engaged, are jaded. I would rather have the Reserve regiment than the Twenty-first Alabama; it has had no experience, and is less than one-fourth the size. The enemy is in very heavy force, presses me at all points, but I take the bull by the horns. This force cannot be reduced, and should be replaced only by troops that have had actual experience. All well. Come and take a look at things.

R. L. GIBSON,

Brigadier-General.

MARCH 27, 1865.

General LIDDELL:

Enemy attempted to advance his lines at sunset, but was wholly unsuccessful. He is persistent in his attempt to gain all the ground he can and feels us at every point. I am, compelled to extend my line on the left. I lost 5 men killed and 44 wounded to-day. I attribute this loss to the want of tools to throw up skirmish pits and traverses. I have an immense deal of digging to do, as the enemy is erecting heavier batteries on the right and left, which enfilade the lines. Three of his gun-boats were on the bar and fired at the fort about sunset. All but one retired after a few rounds, and we all think the one remaining was sunk. I cannot say certainly, but I think so.

R. L. GIBSON,

Brigadier-General.