War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 1115 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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August 24. The officers and men were discharged at one, with the exception of one officer (Captain Spencer) and five men designated to take charge of the signal stores, and report to the Chief Signal Officer of the Army of Washington. At the time when I assumed charge of the detachment, in April, the official papers and records of the office were found in a somewhat confused condition and very incomplete. The discipline of the detachment was unsatisfactory. The articles of War had never been read to the enlisted men, as required by Army Regulations. No morning reports of the command were rendered to any one. The detachment had not been paid for the months. One-fourth of the men had no horses. There was a vast amount of public property on hand that was not required for use in the detachment. The Articles of War were read to the enlisted men every alternate month. Morning reports of the command were promptly rendered. Muster and pay rolls were made out and the entire detachment paid up to April 30, 1865. Frequent and thorough inspections were made. All unserviceable and surplus property was turned in. Horses and new were armed with Colt navy revolvers and light cavalry sabers. The men were armed with Colt navy revolvers and light cavalry sabers. Frequent cavalry drills were had. Police regulations were established, and the men soon began to look and act and feel like soldiers.

To Second Lieutenant Asa T. Abbott, Signal Corps, U. S. Army, belongs the credit of thus reorganizing and re-equipping and disciplining the enlisted men of the detachment under my command. It was deemed advisable to assign this duty to Lieutenant Abbott from the fact that he was so well qualified for the successful discharge of such duties and at the same time a stranger to the enlisted men. By the faithful discharge of his duties, his manly deportment, and correct duties and at the same time a stranger to the enlisted men. By the faithful discharge of his duties, his manly deportment, and correct habits they soon learned to respect him as an officer and a man. In closing this report I deem it my duty to favorably mention First Lieutenant J. L. Hollepeter, Second Lieuts. William Quinton, Henry R. Flook, Samuel J. Brent, Alfred K. Taylor, and Theodore Mallaby, jr. During the short time that I wa officially associated with the above-mentioned officers, it was my pleasure to ever find them zealous, prompt, and reliable in the discharge of all duties assigned them. They are men of intelligence, gentlemanly in their deportment, and endowed with all the requisites that go to make up the true soldier. The valuable services rendered by these officers during the last three years speak well for them, and they can berm truly proud of the honorable record they had made for themselves during the late rebellion. In mentioning in this connection Second Lieutenant Asa T. Abbott, Signal Corps, U. S. Army, I would inform you that I have carefully watched his conduct since Augusta, 1861. During the memorable campaigns of Generals Banks and Pope through Northern Virginia in 1862, Lieutenant Abbott, then being and enlisted man, won my admiration for his many acts of true bravery, at times, too, when he had no incentive for action or expected any reward by promotion. As a commissioned officer he has won my respect and esteem by the intelligent and efficient manner in which he has preformed every duty assigned him. Of unflinching patriotism, zealous, and reliable, he had served his country faithfully and well.

I am, very respectfully, colonel, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. SPENCER,

Captain and Chief Signal Officer, Mil. Div. of the Tennessee.