War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 1061 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TENNESSEE, No. 1. Knoxville, July 3, 1865.

The undersigned, in accordance with General Orders, No. 1, headquarters Military Division of the Tennessee, hereby assumes command of the Department of Tennessee. A. J. Alexander, brevet brigadier-general, U. S. Volunteers, is announced chief of staff. All correspondence from subordinate commanders and others not strictly appertaining and belonging to the current business of the adjutant-general's department will be addressed to General Alexander.

GEO. STONEMAN,

Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TENNESSEE, No. 2. Knoxville, July 3, 1865.

The Department of Tennessee, instituted by General Orders, No. 1, headquarters Military Division of the Tennessee, will until further orders be divided into three districts, viz: East, West, and Middle. The District of East Tennessee will embrace that portion of the State of Tennessee lying east of the Sequatchie River, Crossville, Clear Fork, and Big Fork of the Cumberland River. Brigadier and Bvt. Major General Alvan C. Gillem is assigned to the command of this district, with embrace that portion of the State of Tennessee [between the Tennessee] and Mississippi Rivers. Brigadier and Bvt. Major General John E. Smith is in command of this district, with headquarters at Memphis, Tenn. The District of Middle Tennessee will embrace all of the State of Tennessee not embraced in the other two districts. During the absence of Major-General Rousseau, Bvt. Major General R. W. Johnson, U. S. Volunteers, will command the Middle District, with headquarters at Murfreesborough, to which place they are changed from Nashville, Tenn. General Rousseau will report by letter to these headquarters previous to resigning command of the district.

GEORGE STONEMAN,

Major-General.

ATLANTA, GA., July 3, 1865.

[Captain E. P. INHOFF,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:]

The within is not an exact but an approximate exhibit of the condition of the several counties. Such counties as Morgan, should support their own poor. Many families reported non-producing, never produce supplies; for instance, those who live in the cities and towns. Some of this class must be furnished with food, and nearly all are without means of purchasing. I recommended that supplies of corn near or flour and meat be shipped to Atlanta, put in charge of a proper officer, and by him forwarded to the several country seats, where they can be issued by persons who are acquainted with the individual necessities, acting in conjunction with agents of the Government. Frauds on the part of the people, as well as the part of some civil authorities, who have heretofore governed these matters, must be guarded against. I think supplies should be issued for a limited period, issues to take place every ten days. Because of the distance which many persons must travel, and because of the limited means of transportation in the hands of citizens generally, the issue should be for ten days, or at least for seven. To prevent imposition, issues ought not to cover a long period. The