War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 1059 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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NASHVILLE, TENN., July 2, 1865.

(Received 10.35 a.m. 3rd.)

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

General-in-Chief:

General Wilson informs me that in execution of your orders to send 2,000 cavalry to South Carolina he has sent 700 to Orangeburg, and General Gillmore has notified him of their arrival at that place. General Gillmore informs General Wilson that the 700 is enough for South Carolina. Do you wish anything more done in the matter?

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

ORDERS.] HDQRS. CAV. CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Macon, Ga., July 2, 1865.

TO THE OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE CAVALRY CORPS,

MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI:

Your corps has ceased to exist. The rebellion has terminated in the establishment of your country upon the basis of nationality and perpetual unity. Your deeds have contributed a noble part to the glorious result. They have passed into history and need to recital from me. In the nine months during which I have commanded you, I have heard no word of reproach upon your conduct, have had no disaster to chronicle. The glowing memories of Franklin, Nashville, West Harpeth, Ebenezer Church, Selma, Montgomery, Columbus, West Point, and Macon may well fill your hearts and mine with pride. You have learned to believe yourselves invincible, and contemplating your honorable deeds may well justly cherish that belief. You may be proud of your splendid discipline no less than your courage, zeal, and endurance. The noble impulses which have inspired you in the past will be a source of enduring honor in the future. Peace has her victories no less than war. Do not forget that clear heads, honest hearts, and stout arms, guided by pure patriotism, are the surest defense of our country in every peril. Upon the depend the substantial progress of your race and order of civilization, as well as the liberty of all mankind. Let your example in civil life be an incitement to industry, good order, and enlightenment, while your deeds in war shall live in the grateful remembrance of your countrymen. Having discharged every military duty honestly and faithfully, return to your homes with the noble sentiment of your martyr President deeply impressed upon every heart, "With malice against none, and charity for all, strive to do the right as God gives you to see the right."

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

MACON, July 2, 1865.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS,

Nashville, Tenn.:

Your telegrams of yesterday are received. I took the necessary steps six weeks ago to protect the Andersonville Cemetery. A good man is in charge of the place. I have sent no cavalry to Florida since McCook returned from there. I had the 2,000 men ready for South Carolina, and was informed by Gillmore that 700 would do. A regiment of that strength was sent and has arrived at Orangeburg. I have about 6,000 left, besides the negroes. Want Croxton, MInty, and La Grange back if possible; can you send them? I forwarded on the 20th of June G. W. Smith's application for pardon, with oath and a