War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0982 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS., ALA., & W. FLA.

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commanding Military Division of West Mississippi, the commanding officer will proceed with his command and report to Lieutenant-Colonel Miner, commanding cavalry depot at Edgefield, Tenn.

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By command of Major-General Thomas:

HENRY M. CIST,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. 4TH DIV., CAVALRY CORPS, MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Numbers 21.

Edgefield, Tenn., June 10, 1865.

Before severing his connection with the command the brevet major-general commanding desires to express his high appreciation of the bravery, endurance, and soldierly qualities displayed by the officers and men of his division in the late cavalry campaign. Leaving Chickasaw on the 22nd of March as a new organization, and without status in the Cavalry Corps, you in one month traversed 600 miles, crossed six rivers; met and defeated the enemy at Montevallo, capturing 100 prisoners; routed Forrest, Buford, and Roddey in their chosen position at Ebenezer Church, capturing 2 guns and 300 prisoners; carried the works in your front at Selma, capturing 1; guns, 1,100 prisoners, and 5 battle-flags, and finally crowned your successes by a night assault upon the enemy's entrenchments at Columbus, where you captured 1,500 prisoners, 24 guns, 8 battle-flags, and vast minutions of war. April 21 you arrived at Macon, having captured on your march 3,000 prisoners, 39 pieces of artillery, and 13 battle-flags. Whether mounted with the saber or dismounted with the carbine, the brave men of the Third, Fourth, and Fifth Iowa, First and Seventh Ohio, and Tenth Missouri Cavalry triumphed over the enemy in every conflict. With regiments led by brave colonels, and brigades commanded with consummate skill and daring, the division in thirty days won a reputation unsurpassed in the service. Though many of you have not received the rewards your gallantry has entitled you to, you have received the commendation of your superior officers, and have won the admiration and gratitude of your countrymen. You will return to your homes with the good consciousness of having defended the flag of your country in the hour of the greatest national peril, while through your instrumentality liberty and civilization will have advanced the greatest stride recorded in history. The best wishes of your commanding general will ever attend you.

E. UPTON.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, June 10, 1865.

Major-General STONEMAN,

Knoxville, Tenn.:

Your telegram of the 4th of June reached me. You will accept my thanks for the information it contains. I have no doubt of the correctness of the view you take upon all the points mentioned. The matter will be made public. I hope you will get your report into General Thomas' hands early, so that the whole subject may be brought to light.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.