War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0949 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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those about to leave us, and resolve to do our duty in accordance with our obligations, or as long as our country requires our services.

W. L. ELLIOTT,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Macon, Ga., June 2, 1865

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS,

Nashville;

General Winslow reports again from Atlanta that in the ten counties adjacent to that place there are from 5,000 to 8,000 families, in all from 25,000 to 50,000 persons, who are utterly destitute of bread or of any kind of food. Women and children walk from ten to forty miles for food and then obtain only a moiety, frequently nothing. I have already given to the people all of the Confederate and State stores and itches, and appointed two energetic citizens to superintended their distribution, but the help is inadequate. All of our efforts hitherto to obtain grain by the river have failed to supply us and the additional tax imposed by the destitution of the people. The Western and Atlantic Railroad is our only sure way of getting the necessary stores. That line being State property, I have taken possession of it for the United States and am working a large force in repairing it between Atlanta and Dalton, but am greatly embarrassed for want of tools. These I am willing to buy, borrow, or take by issue and compensate the Government at full prices out of the earnings of the road. I should be allowed the fullest latitude in this matter or great trouble will ensue. I am permitted to issue rations, under proper restrictions, to starving people, but can't issue unless I have a source of supplies. Please give the necessary instructions for sales of materials to the railroad in charge of General Winslow. This is the surest way out of the difficulty.

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Macon, Ga., June 2, 1865-9 a.m.

Major General E. UPTON,

Nashville, Tenn.:

Your telegram of 31st May is received. I have no objection to you sending Alexander to Kentucky, but get through the work of mustering out and hurry back here yourself.

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Macon, Ga., June 2, 1865.-9 a.m.

Brevet Brigadier-General WINSLOW,

Atlanta, Ga.:

Your communication of 31st is received. I agree with you that political meetings of any kind are unnecessary at this time, even when regulated by a proper sentiment of loyalty. It will be time enough to begin moving in such matters when the Government has announced its policy. It has every necessary assurance in regard to the disposition of the people, and needs no expression of opinion at this time. You