War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0861 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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AUGUSTA, May 21, 1865.

Major General J. H. WILSON:

The Georgia Railroad advertises that they shall, after to-morrow, refuse free passage of paroled prisoners on their way home. General Schofield's order only authorized me to give passage on military roads. As the railroad is not in my jurisdiction I respectfully notify you, and I think a threat to seize the road would induce them to continue their old arrangement and save much trouble in returning and forwarding the prisoners.

E. L. MOLINEUX,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Macon. Ga., May 21, 1865.

Bvt. Brigadier General E. L. MOLINEUX,

Augusta, Ga.:

Notify the Georgia Railroad Company that they must continue to carry paroled prisoners until the whole business is ended. In the event of their refusing to do so you are authorized to seize the Georgia Railroad for the use of the Government.

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS, MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, No. 85.

Macon, Ga., May 21, 1865.

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III. In pursuance of instructions of the Secretary of War, Captain Van Antwerp, aide-de-camp, will proceed with a sufficient guard to Athens, Ga., and arrest Major General Howell Cobb, late of the C. S. Army. Having performed this duty, Captain Van Antwerp will proceed with his prisoner to Atlanta, Ga., and report to these headquarters by telegraph for further orders.

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By command of Brevet Major-General Wilson:

E. B. BEAUMONT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Tallahassee, May 21, 1865.

Major E. B. BEAUMONT:

I will march from here as soon as General Vogdes sends an officer to receive the public property now in my charge. The amount is much greater than I had anticipated, and the task assigned me here by the general I am satisfied is of greater magnitude than he supposed. Over 3,000 men and officers have already, been paroled and from 5,000 to 6,000 stand of arms received; twenty or thirty pieces of artillery and immense quantities of ammunition, sugar, sirup, bacon, &c. I will transport all the bacon possible to Alabany, in order to ship to the command at Macon. I have ordered the cattle driven up, but fear they will be of no use to you. They are all in a miserably lean condition, like everything else in this country. I have already ordered in my troops from