War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0843 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HDQRS. FIRST SUB-DISTRICT OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE,

Tullahoma, Tenn., May 19, 1865.

Captain HENRY SHOOK,

McMinnville, Tenn.:

SIR: Your letter of this date reporting the fact that a number of bushwhackers had surrendered to you has been received. Your action in the matter has been approved by the major-general commanding. All other bands may be received in the same way. Champ Ferguson and his band have been declared outlaws by Major-General Rousseau. The major-general commanding therefore directs that you do not accept the surrender of Ferguson or any member of his band, and that you treat them as outlaws. You will immediately make a list or roll of all those how long in service, age, rank, and when and where, surrendered,to whom surrendered, and where they live.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. O. CRAVENS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

LEXINGTON, KY., May 19, 1865.

Major BRIDGEWATER, Stanford, Ky.:

Send a detachment of your command to Somerset and vicinity to capture and kill a gang of twenty-five guerrillas near that place.

By order of Brigadier-General Hobson:

J. S. BUTLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SOMERSET, May 19, 1865.

Brigadier-General HOBSON:

There are guerrillas murdering and robbing some twenty-five miles from here. Will you have me furnished with horses as soon as convenient. My company is unmounted and can not do much good. if you can not furnish me, please give "orders" to press Government horses which are in hands of citizens.

W. P. INGRAM,

Captain Company D, Kentucky State Troops.

LEXINGTON, KY., May 19, 1865.

Captain INGRAM, Somerset, Ky.:

Have ordered some of Bridgewater's men to hunt guerrillas you report. Look out for them.

By order of Brigadier-General Hobson:

J. S. BUTLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. ARMY AND DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI,

Mobile, Ala., May 19, 1865. (Received 10 p. m. 22nd.)

SECRETARY OF WAR,

Washington, D. C.:

There are several railroad and telegraph lines of importance to us for military purposes that cannot be put in working order without introducing material from the North. As we hold the termini of these lines,